Layla AbdelRahim

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Revolt Library People Layla AbdelRahim

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About Layla AbdelRahim

Layla AbdelRahim is a Russian-Sudanese comparatist anthropologist and anarchoprimitivist author, whose works on narratives of civilization and wilderness have contributed to the fields of literary and cultural studies, comparative literature, philosophy, animal studies, ecophilosophy, sociology, anarcho-primitivist thought, anarchism, epistemology, and critique of civilization, technology, and education. She attributes the collapse in the diversity of bio-systems and environmental degradation to monoculturalism and the civilized ontology that explains existence in terms of anthropocentric utilitarian functions.

Her books Children's Literature, Domestication, and Social Foundation: Narratives of Civilization and Wilderness (Routledge 2015) and Wild Children – Domesticated Dreams: Civilization and the Birth of Education (Fernwood 2013) make a contribution to children's literary theory and a critique of education as rooted in the civilized need for the domestication of children as resources.

(Source: Wikipedia.org.)

Layla AbdelRahim received her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College. Upon graduation, she won the Watson Fellowship to conduct an anthropological study in Europe. She spent a year at l’École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris before receiving her M.A. from Stockholm University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Montreal. Her dissertation was published by Routledge in 2015. She is also the author of a book on the anthropology and philosophy of education, published by Fernwood in 2013. She has worked in refugee relief and journalism of war in North East Africa and currently teaches at the University of Quebec in Trois-Rivieres on a part-time basis.

Layla is interested in the underlying premises of civilization and the principles of life in wilderness. These premises and principles inform specific economic positions and social organization that different groups adopt with direct repercussions for the environment. To understand the mechanisms that ensure the endurance of cultural choices, even when these choices are not viable, the researcher uses comparative and interdisciplinary research methods to examine the issuing material, social, and symbolic cultures and political and socio-economic paradigms. In other words, she works on a comprehensive approach to the Anthropocene and its concomitant Holocene Extinction from a biocentric perspective to explain the ecological crisis and the eruption of violence around the world. Layla interest in the epistemic foundation of civilized society came from my work on nationalism, violence, and war and led her to explore the links between fictional and scientific stories of origins and anthropological and other narratives of predation as well as the mechanisms of reproduction of violence through education and other cultural encoding. This investigation resulted in two peer-reviewed books. Wild Children – Domesticated Dreams: Civilization and the Birth of Education (Fernwood 2013) is an obvious wink at Foucault and it explores the ways in which the underlying premises of predation imbue the structure of pedagogy. Children’s Literature, Domestication, and Social Foundation: Narratives of Civilization and Wilderness (Routledge 2015) examines the impact on the environment that the civilized premises of the Anthropocene had through various mythological, religious, and scientific explanations about humanity and the world.

(Source: sas.utmn.ru.)

Layla AbdelRahim is a comparativist anthropologist. She is the author of two books, numerous essays, and fiction. Her main field is epistemology with a focus on civilization and the roots of violence between human animals and against other animals and the environment. Her work contributes to a range of disciplines, such as anthropology, epistemology, animal studies, literary and cultural studies, anarchism, philosophy, sociology, geography, environmental studies, and education.

(Source: routledge.com.)

From : Wikipedia.org / SAS.UTMN.ru / Routledge.com

Works

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This person has authored 5 documents, with 31,079 words or 197,646 characters.

Avatar is rich in historical allusions and James Cameron deftly weaves into the fabric of the film the core of the relations between humans and their world. Namely, the film is primarily about the two clashing world-views at the core of the relationship between the civilized and the wild. Informed and justified by the Darwinian narrative, the civilized perspective stresses competition and violence, in which the balance of power is achieved by the strong teaming up together against everyone rendered weaker for the purposes of conquest and use as resources, whereas the wild position sees life as a process of cooperation and the balancing of forces, not powers. This is the debate between Kropotkian and Darwinian evolutionary science as well as... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
1. Beyond the Symbolic John Zerzan is one of the most interesting contemporary thinkers in the United States, at least. Like everything else in life, in order to fully appreciate Zerzan’s contribution to epistemology or the philosophy of civilization, first, one has to read his work and hear his conferences — for, here, I only present my personal interpretation of his theory — and second, consider the context through which his voice and energy resonate. His contribution becomes even more impressive in light of the processes of Western institutionalization of Thought and commodification of Knowledge — a totalitarian context that tolerates no challenge (philosophical or otherwise) that would threaten “the Amer... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
We are taught since early childhood that everything in the world exists in a food chain as a "resource” to be consumed by those higher up the chain and concurrently as the consumer of "resources” that are lower in this predatory hierarchy. We are also told that life in the wild is hungry, fraught with mortal danger and that civilization has spared us a short and brutish existence. As children, we thus come to believe that life in civilization is good for us, in fact even indispensable for our very survival. Today’s civilization, namely the European/Western, owes its existence to the Agricultural Revolution, which was born in the Fertile Crescent with the domestication of emmer wheat in the Middle East around 17,000 B.P.-a... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
We contacted Layla AbdelRahim and asked her to answer our questions. Layla willingly responded and her answers are really comprehensive. Who is Layla AbdelRahim? from Wikipedia: Layla AbdelRahim is a Canadian comparatist anthropologist and author, whose works on narratives of civilization and wilderness have contributed to the fields of literary and cultural studies, animal studies, philosophy, sociology, anarcho-primitivst thought, epistemology, and critique of civilization and education. She attributes the collapse in the diversity of bio-systems and environmental degradation to monoculturalism and the civilized ontology that explains existence in terms of anthropocentric utilitarian functions. Her books Children’s Literature, Dom... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
This work first appeared as a 15-page paper for a doctoral seminar in education at McGill University, Montreal in October 2002. Claudia Mitchell, our professor, challenged us to reflect on the phenomenology of children’s space. My paper for that course focused on my child’s room. I have since incorporated contrastive and reflective elements from my anthropological observations on childhood and edited the form and the content of the first version to present at the CHILDHOODS 2005 conference in July in Oslo. Before proceeding further, I would like to clarify what may come off as a categorical condemnation of ALL of society or of ALL of ‘civilized‘ ‘Western’ society. When I apply these terms and categories,... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

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February 10, 2022; 5:56:04 PM (America/Los_Angeles)
Added to http://www.RevoltLib.com.

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