Browsing People : Persons and Individuals Involved with the Revolution

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(1961 - 2020)
David Rolfe Graeber (/ˈɡreɪbər/; born February 12, 1961) is an American anthropologist, anarchist activist and author known for his 2011 Debt: The First 5000 Years, 2015 The Utopia of Rules and 2018 Bullshit Jobs: A Theory. He is a professor of anthropology at the London School of Economics. (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1893 - )
Marcus Graham (1893 – December 1985) was an anarchist active in the United States from the 1910s to his death in the 1980s. Graham was born in Canada. "Marcus Graham" was a pseudonym for "Shmuel Marcus."... (From : Wikipedia.org.)


Andrej Grubačić is a US-based Yugoslav Sociologist, Balkan federalist, and university Professor with a Yugoslavian background who has written on cooperation and mutual aid in world history, world systems theory, labor history, and the history of the Balkans. He is the grandson of Ratomir Dugonjić, Yugoslav partizan leader and communist revolutionary. An advocate of an anarchist approach to world-systems theory, Grubačić is one of the protagonists of "new anarchism", and a prominent member of the now defunct antiglobalization or global justice movement. He is also a member of the International Organization for a Participatory Society. He is a long standing friend of the Kurdish freedom movement. His writings and interests range from comparative world history of exilic ("non-state") spaces and exilic societies to the neo-marxist world-systems analysis, and from the sociology of stateless democracy to the history of mutual aid. He is an active participants in... (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1950 - )
Agustín Guillamón Iborra , born in Barcelona in 1950 , is a historian of the revolutionary workers movement and of the Spanish War and Revolution of 1936. (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1844 - 1916) ~ Leader of the Anarchist Section of the First International : He later became one of the leading members of the Jura Federation, the Anarchist wing, of the First International. He met Bakunin in 1869, and adopted much of his anarcho-collectivist ideas. Both Guillaume and Bakunin were expelled from the International at the Hague Congress in 1872. (From : Anarchy Archives.)
• "The truth cannot be decided by vote; it verifies and imposes itself by the mighty power of its own evidence." (From : "Ideas on Social Organization," by James Guillaume....)
• "It is painfully evident that authoritarianism is incompatible with an enlightened system of education." (From : "Ideas on Social Organization," by James Guillaume....)
• "The revolution cannot be confined to a single country: it is obliged under pain of annihilation to spread, if not to the whole world, at least to a considerable number of civilized countries." (From : "Ideas on Social Organization," by James Guillaume....)

(1904 - 1988) ~ French Theorist of Anarcho-Communism, Anti-Fascism, and Anti-Colonialism : ...as Guerin grew older, his politics moved increasingly leftward, leading him later in life to espouse a hybrid of anarchism and marxism. Arguably, his most important book from this period of his life is Anarchism: From Theory to Practice... (From : Faatz Bio.)
• "In general, the bureaucracy of the totalitarian State is unsympathetic to the claims of self-management to autonomy." (From : "Anarchism: From Theory to Practice," by Daniel Gu....)
• "Because anarchism is constructive, anarchist theory emphatically rejects the charge of utopianism. It uses the historical method in an attempt to prove that the society of the future is not an anarchist invention, but the actual product of the hidden effects of past events." (From : "Anarchism: From Theory to Practice," by Daniel Gu....)
• "The anarchist regards the State as the most deadly of the preconceptions which have blinded men through the ages." (From : "Anarchism: From Theory to Practice," by Daniel Gu....)


I.W.W. activist, revolutionary, activist, rebel....


Wobbly, anarchist, activist, revolutionary.

(1851 - 1928)
Isabel Florence Hapgood was an American ecumenist, writer and translator, especially of Russian and French texts. Hapgood was born in Boston, to Asa Hapgood and Lydia Anna Bronson Crossley, with her twin brother Asa. Their parents later had another son, William Frank Hapgood (who became a patent lawyer). Asa Hapgood was an inventor, and his family of English and Scottish descent had lived near Worcester, Massachusetts since the 17th century. Her mother's father had emigrated from England and owned a farm in Mason County, Kentucky. While Asa was sent to Harvard University, which did not accept women (and ultimately went into the paper business), Isabel attended Worcester's Collegiate Institute between 1863 and 1865, then transferred to Miss Porter's School in Farmington, Connecticut. She graduated in 1868, the year her father died. Hapgood showed considerable language abilities, mastering many Romance and Germanic as well as Slavic languages, including Russian, Polish an... (From : Wikipedia.org.)

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