People : Persons and Individuals Involved with the Revolution

Total People : 560

Want to know about the people who are responsible for making social change throughout history? Then you're looking in the right place.

By learning about those who fought against injustice in the past, we can learn more about ourselves. The teacher of history has many lessons about overcoming our weaknesses and tempering our strengths.

This archive contains 566 texts, with 141,792 words or 924,955 characters.

Revolt Library People

Not Logged In: Login?

Newest Additions

(1826 - 1898) ~ Matilda Joslyn Gage
Matilda Joslyn Gage was an American writer and activist. She is mainly known for her contributions to women's suffrage in the United States (i.e. the right to vote) but she also campaigned for Native American rights, abolitionism (the end of slavery), and freethought (the free exercise of reason in matters of religious belief). She is the eponym for the Matilda effect, which describes the tendency to deny women credit for scientific invention. She influenced her son-in-law L. Frank Baum, the author of The Wizard of Oz. She was the youngest speaker at the 1852 National Women's Rights Convention held in Syracuse, New York. She was a tireless worker and public speaker, and contributed numerous articles to the press, being regarded as "one of the most logical, fearless and scientific writers of her day". During 1878–1881, she published and edited the National Citizen, a paper devoted to the cause of women. With Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, she was for yea... (From : Wikipedia.org / WomenOfTheHall.org.)

(1815 - 1902) ~ Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American writer and activist who was a leader of the women's rights movement in the U.S. during the mid- to late-19th century. She was the main force behind the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, the first convention to be called for the sole purpose of discussing women's rights, and was the primary author of its Declaration of Sentiments. Her demand for women's right to vote generated a controversy at the convention but quickly became a central tenet of the women's movement. She was also active in other social reform activities, especially abolitionism. In 1851, she met Susan B. Anthony and formed a decades-long partnership that was crucial to the development of the women's rights movement. During the American Civil War, they established the Women's Loyal National League to campaign for the abolition of slavery, and they led it in the largest petition drive in U.S. history up to that time. They... (From : Wikipedia.org / WomensHistory.org.)

Ridhiman Balaji
Researching income inequality in the United States... (Source: ResearchGate.net.) Student, Independent researcher, Writer (Source: Academia.edu.)... (From : ResearchGate.net.)

Rifki Syarani Fachry

(1942 - ) ~ Rik Lina
RIK LINA (The Netherlands 1942) lived and worked on different continents, preferably in wild nature, as a way of life using Odilon Redon’s advise: “Immerse yourself into nature!”. For this he dedicated life and art to study the deserts, the mountains, tropical rainforest- and coral reef jungles. In 1975, the emigration to the Caribbean island of Bonaire became an essential experience for his work with more than a thousand hours of scuba-diving. A major part of his drawing, painting and graphic work represents poetry and life of the pelagic realms, next to his explorations of the jungles of cloud forests and inner space. ​ After studies at the Rietveld Academy of Amsterdam (1961-1966) he made countless individual and collective international exhibitions. In 1968 he made contact with the surrealists by the BRUMES BLONDS magazine of Laurens Vancrevel and joined the MOUVEMENT PHASES” of Edouard Jaguer since the 1972 exhibition in Peru: “Homage to C&... (From : RikLina.com.)

Blasts from the Past

(1896 - 1980)
Henry Poulaille (5 December 1896, Paris – 30 March 1980, Cachan) was a French writer and a pioneer of proletarian literature. (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1952 - 2005)
It is with great sadness that we learned of the death last week of Harald Beyer-Arnesen. News of his death was circulated by Jonas Bals, who sent the following report. “Last night we were told that Harald has passed away, probably due to a heart condition. Needless to say, we are all saddened by this sudden loss of a good friend and comrade. For many years now, Harald has contributed in significant ways to a variety of anarchist activities in Oslo, and been a torn in the eye of quite a few bosses. Largely due to blacklisting in the health sector where Harald worked the last years as a waged wage slave, he had some time left over for discussions and debates, in cyberspace and elsewhere. Most of you will probably only know him from this forum, where he surely has had his rows – just like we had ours with him in flesh and blood. Most of those discussions would have been drabber, duller and less educative had he not taken part. From now o... (From : Anarkismo.net.)

(1813 - 1869)
Anselme Bellegarrigue (23 March 1813, Monfort – ca. 1869, Central America) was a French individualist anarchist. He participated in the French Revolution of 1848, was author and editor of Anarchie, Journal de l'Ordre and Au fait ! Au fait ! Interprétation de l'idée démocratique. Anselme Bellegarrigue came back to France on 21 February 1848, the day before the events that would end the reign of Louis-Philippe I. He participated in the revolt but never ceased criticizing the direction taken by the movement from the day following the end of the July Monarchy: as a young worker passes by saying "This time, we won't be robbed of our victory!" (a reference to the July Revolution that had failed to install a regime satisfying workers' demands), he responds : "Ah, my friend, the victory has already been robbed: hasn't a temporary government been declared?". He also participated in the Société Républicaine Centrale (also ca... (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1912 - 1995) ~ Canadian Anarchist Essayist and Literary Critic : ...sought to raise awareness of the revolution in Spain and of what was being achieved by the Spanish working class against great odds. He was a firm believer in the working class's ability to reorganize society along fundamentally democratic and egalitarian lines. (From : Kevin Doyle Bio.)
• "...the clock represents an element of mechanical tyranny in the lives of modern men more potent than any individual exploiter or any other machine." (From : "The Tyranny of the Clock," by George Woodcock, 19....)
• "In a sane and free society such an arbitrary domination of man's functions by either clock or machine would obviously be out of the question. The domination of man by the creation of man is even more ridiculous than the domination of man by man." (From : "The Tyranny of the Clock," by George Woodcock, 19....)
• "Only if he is willing to accept of the hazards of living by his faith or his wits can the man without money avoid living as a slave to the clock." (From : "The Tyranny of the Clock," by George Woodcock, 19....)

I Never Forget a Face

Tagged

I've Heard It Said...

Let Me Tell You About a Friend of Mine

Biographies

Fragments of Our Past

Well-Liked Friends

Share :
Home|About|News|Feeds|Search|Contact|Privacy Policy