Anarchism : Anarchist and Anti-Authoritarianism

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Total Anarchist Works : 1069

Want to know about Anarchism as a theory and a movement throughout history and up to the present? Then you've found the right place.

Whether it is Collectivist Anarchism or Individualist Anarchism, Mutualist Anarchism or Communist Anarchism, every type is given its bit of room for expression here.

This archive contains 3,600 texts, with 17,432,285 words or 106,882,400 characters.

Newest Additions

1934 ~ Leader : From the Anarchist Encyclopedia (S. Faure), by Aristide Lapeyre
Leader: English word (from to lead) passed into common usage. One of those words universally used. In the English parliament the leader is the member of the assembly who groups around him the men of the same party, of the same opinion, who pursue the realization of the same program. We naturally distinguish the leader of the government from that of the opposition...the leader is the most visible personality of his party. By extension, we call leader the main article of a newspaper. Also, the horse that leads a race, gallops at the head of the others. In a party one must be careful not to take the leader for the most serious, the most cultivated, the most intelligent man. Often he is nothing but the most versatile, the lowest, the most ignorant. His superiority resides in his ability to raise himself to the leading position by the usual political means, i.e., intrigue and a lack of conscience. B... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

1912 ~ A visit to L’anarchie
. Armand assumed the editorship of LAnarchie from April 4th, 1912 to September of the same year. These dates are inscribed in his own handwriting on a questionnaire which he had filled out at the request of Alain Sergent (Andre Mahe) at the time when Sergent was gathering documentation to write his Historie de Anarchie, of which one volume has so far appeared. Here is a picturesque public report by the Temps of May, 1912, where this brief period in . Armands life is captured. It is not without interest to see how the anarchists of 1912 are depicted in one of the best-known journals of the time. A Visit to LAnarchie LAnarchie is located in the quartier Saint-Paul on an old and narrow street which bears the picturesque name rue du Grenier-surlEau. Above the door... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

1952 ~ Economic Imperialism, by Alan John Percivale Taylor
Ideas live longer than men, and the writer who can attach his name to an idea is safe for immortality. Darwin will live as long as Evolution, Marx be forgotten only when there are no class-struggles. In the same way, no survey of the international history of the twentieth century can be complete without the name of J A Hobson. He it was who found an economic motive for Imperialism. Lenin took over Hobsons explanation, which thus became the basis for Communist foreign policy to the present day. Non-Marxists were equally convinced, and contemporary history has been written largely in the light of Hobsons discovery. This discovery was an off-shoot from his general doctrine of under-consumption. The capitalists cannot spend their share of the national production. Saving makes their predicament worse. They demand openings for investment outside their saturated national market, and they find these openings in the undeveloped parts of the world. This is Imperialism. In Hob... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

1960 ~ Sydney Libertarianism, by Allan James "Jim" Baker
I. SOCIAL THEORY. In explaining their position Sydney libertarians often refer to their interest in social theory. But this phrase, social theory, can suggest, not only empirical study, but also the making of certain criticisms; and at the same time, the question may be asked: How are these connected with the attitudes and sympathies libertarians have, with their support for particular social causes? Thus we should expect social theory to be concerned with developing true views about the nature and interconnection of social phenomena, and the position of libertarians does depend partly on what they take to be certain facts about how society operates. But this almost always gets connected with criticism and argument, for the social theorist is led to demolish certain fallacious arguments he encounters. For example, libertarians take the important thing about religion to be the actual, earthly role of religious institutions, but the... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

1899 ~ The Relation of Anarchism to Organization, by Fred Schulder
The theory of anarchism has a destructive, as well as a constructive side. It, being the doctrine of equal liberty, it is necessarily opposed to all that destroys this equal liberty, classing all such destructive agencies under the general term government. This word has been defined by anarchists as invasion of the noninvasive individuals liberty. In this sense, I must insist that the word be used in this discussion, for in this sense I shall use it: and if, in criticizing my statements, you use the word in a different sense, you are not criticizing the thought expressed by me, but only a thing of your own manufacture. It may be claimed, however, that government, even in this sense, is but imperfectly defined until we know what does, and what does not, constitute invasion of equal liberty in every imaginable case. I concede that a difficulty exists herethat the line cannot be quite definitely drawn. But pray, have... (From : Fair-Use.org.)

Blasts from the Past

1867
No Treason I Lysander Spooner Table of Contents Introductory. No Treason. No. 1. I. II. III. IV. Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, By LYSANDER SPOONER, in the Clerk's office of the District Court of the United States, for the District of Massachusetts. INTRODUCTORY. The question of treason is distinct from that of slavery; and is the same that it would have been, if free States, instead of slave States, had seceded. On the part of the North, the war was carried on, not to liberate the slaves, but by a government that had always perverted and violated the Constitution, to keep the slaves in bondage; and was still willing to do so, if the slaveholders could be thereby induced to stay in the Union. The... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

1950
The problems of the social system in Russia have often been compared with those created by revolutionary France more than a century and a half ago. An understanding of both, it is said, requires perspective. Historians are reminded that the years have dissolved the acrimony heaped on the events of the Great French Revolution that more 'good' than 'harm' was done. Much the same is implied for Russia. Supporters, even mild critics, of the Stalin regime tell us that so 'new' a phenomenon requires the test of many generations, that the judgment nourished by immediate events, by 'passing' abuses, must be suspended until lasting outlines appear. In place of the years and of abuses engendered by 'expediency', a vast theoretical corpus has been brought to the support of the Russian social system. We are invited to equate the nationalization of industry to progress; economic planning to the elimination of crises; mounting indices in steel, coal and petroleum production to... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

1888
Comrade Tacker sends us the second volume of his capital translation of Proudhon. It is admirably printed on toned paper, and strongly and neatly bound. We recommend all our readers who can afford it to send for a copy. The following notice gives all particulars: " System of Economical Contradictions; or., The Philosophy OF Misery P. J. Proudhon. Vol. I, 469 pages octavo.Price in cloth, l4s. 6d.; in full calf, blue, gilt edges, 27s. Published and sold by Benj. R. Tucker, Box 3366, Boston, Mass. " This constitutes the fourth volume of Proudbon's Complete Works, and is uniform in style with the first volume, ' What is Property ?' The second and third volumes of the Complete Works have not yet been published in English. " The next volume to appear will be the fifth of the Complete Worksthat is, the second and final volume of the 'Eco... (From : AnarchyArchives.)

1922
We have just received the following letter from our comrades Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman, who are now stranded in Stockholm. This letter gives us the truth about the terrible persecution of Anarchists in Russia. We ask all Anarchist and Syndicalist papers to republish this letter, and we hope comrades in this country will help us in pushing the sale of this issue, of which we have printed a much larger number than usual. Dear Comrades, The persecution of the revolutionary elements in Russia has not abated with the changed political and economic policies of the Bolsheviki. On the contrary, it has become more intense, more determined. The prisons of Russia, of Ukraina, of Siberia, are filled with men and women aye, in some cases with mere children who dare hold views that differ from those of the ruling Communist Party. We say hold views advisedly. For in the Russia of to-day it is not at all necessary to express... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

1887
I was at the Hague, casually drifting for a few days' holiday through Holland. I had seen Paul Potter's Bull, and Rembrandt's "Anatomy"; all the Princes of Orange, and the prison where De Witt was torn to pieces by the mob. I was a little tired of the sleepy beauty of the Hague, and was languidly scanning the advertisement bills, in choice for the evening's entertainment between a Dutch tragedy and a Parisian operette. Suddenly my eyes rested on the announcement of a Socialist lecture, and my indecision and langour came to an end. I had some trouble in finding Westerbaenstraat 154, where the "Walhalla," the Socialist meeting hall is situated, and I place on record that it is marked as "Westerlaanstraat" on Baedeker's plan. The hall was a bare room behind a row of workman's houses, which (like everything at the Hague) are exceedingly clean, airy and spacious. There were only two or three benches seating a score of people, and the audience... (From : AnarchyArchives.)

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