Browsing : 1 to 30 of 77

Results Per Page :

1 2 3

Written: 1917; Source: The Class Struggle Vol I., No. 1, May-June, 1917; Translated: Lily Lore; Transcription: Sally Ryan for marxists.org, June 2002. While the war is in progress, the highest duty of the socialist proletariat is the fight for its speedy conclusion. But even when peace has been declared, his struggle is not finished. For the effects of the war remain. New problems arise, and must be met. When the soldiers return to their homes, new misery and new want are grinning at them. Awful as have been the sufferings that war has brought, in one respect the lot of the proletarians is still worse in times of peace. In war times the workers are needed; the bourgeoisie needs their enthusiasm, their willingness to sacrifice, thei... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: Controversies: Forum for the Internationalist Communist Left First Published: Anthropogenesis A Study Of The Origin Of Man By Ant. Pannekoek Sc. D. Professor University of Amsterdam; 1953 North-Holland Publishing Company Amsterdam Written: 1944, under German Occupation of Holland; Markup, Editing, Formatting: Controversies: Forum for the Internationalist Communist Left and D. Walters for the Marxists Internet Archive. Preface The present study on Anthropogenesis was written during the war, in 1944, when through the German occupation of Holland ordinary scientific work was greatly impeded. Since the German Military Government had forbidden all publication in English and French, the Amsterdam Academy of Sciences decided that... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: ? Published: In Reichenberg, 1912, under the title "Klassenkampf und Nation". Transcriber: Collective Action Notes (CAN) HTML: Jonas Holmgren Contents: Introduction The Nation and its Transformations The Bourgeois Conception and the Socialist Conception The Nation as Community of Fate The Peasant Nation and the Modern Nation Tradition and the Human Mind Our Task The Nation and the Proletariat Class Antagonism The Will to Form a Nation The Community of Culture The Community of Class Struggle The Nation in the State of the Future The Transformations of the Nation Socialist Tactics Nationalist Demands Ideology and Class Struggle (From: Marxists.org.)
Published: International Council Correspondence, vol. 2, no. 6. May 1936. Originally appeared in Dutch as "Communisme en godsdienst" in Persdienst van de groep van Internationale Communisten in April 1936. The article was published without attribution, but Pannekoek's personal notes make the authorship clear. For more information see the Association Archives Antonie Pannekoek. Note: The original text contains inconsistent capitalization and erroneous or unusual spellings. It has been noted that "Pannekoek strongly objected to correction of his somewhat peculiar English." Transcription/Markup: Micah Muer, 2017. I. The fierce struggle which Bolshevism has waged and is still waging against religion in Russia is particularly well ada... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: Left, No 132, October 1947, p. 225-228. The first world war and the ensuing Russian and German revolutions raised new problems and brought about profound changes in the ideas of workers and Socialists. The German Socialist Party, the apparently powerful organization ready to conquer political dominance and thereby to establish Socialism, when in power turned out a means for reestablishing capitalism. In Russia the workers had beaten down Czarism and taken possession of the factories and the land; now State Capitalism brought them into stricter slavery under a new master class. And not reformism only was to be blamed; the most notable spokesmen of uncompromising radicalism, renowned as Marxists, such as Kautsky and Lenin, were agen... (From: Marxists.org.)
Published: in Persdienst van de Groep van Internationale Communisten, no. 7, 1933.[1] Source: Endpage.com. Transcription/Markup: Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive; reformatted by Micah Muer, 2019. Reformatting/Proofreading: Micah Muer, 2019. The assessment of the burning of the Reichstag in the left communist press once again leads us to raise other questions. Can destruction be a means of struggle for workers? First of all, it must be said that no one will cry over the disappearance of the Reichstag. It was one of the ugliest buildings in modern Germany, a pompous image of the Empire of 1871. But there are other more beautiful buildings, and museums filled with artistic treasures. When a desperate p... (From: Marxists.org.)
There are numerous complaints in the scientific literature about the increasing destruction of forests. But it is not only the joy that every nature-lover feels for forests that should be taken into account. There are also important material interests, indeed the vital interests of humanity. With the disappearance of abundant forests, countries known in Antiquity for their fertility, which were densely populated and famous as granaries for the great cities, have become stony deserts. Rain seldom falls there except as devastating diluvian downpours that carry away the layers of hummus which the rain should fertilize. Where the mountain forests have been destroyed, torrents fed by summer rains cause enormous masses of stones and sand to roll ... (From: Marxists.org.)
Published: Bulletin of the Provisional Bureau in Amsterdam of the Communist International, vol. 1, no. ?. February 1920. Transcription/Markup: Micah Muer, 2017. These differences can partly be traced back to the days of the rise of Communism. The opposition in Germany during the war, against the government and social democracy, had its origin in various centers and in various ways. K. Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg (with Fr. Mehring) maintained an unflinching and inexorable opposition against the war-policy, by means often of illegal writings, and were therefore kept in prison most of the time. The "Spartacus" group which they created constituted the extreme left wing of the "Unabhängige Sozialistische Partei" (the U.S.P., which, u... (From: Marxists.org.)
Published: The New Review, vol. 2, no. 11. November 1914. Transcription/Markup: Micah Muer, 2017. I. Exactly half a century has passed since the International Workingmen's Association was founded in London under the leadership of Karl Marx. It went to pieces after the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 and the Paris Commune. Exactly a quarter of a century ago, at the Congress of 1889 in Paris, the new International was founded. This year the Congress at Vienna was to celebrate the double anniversary. But just a month before it was to take place the firebrand of international war was tossed into Europe from Vienna. With the outbreak of the European War, the new International, too, is disrupted. When the old International was founded (1864)... (From: Marxists.org.)
Published: International Socialist Review, vol. 12, no. 9, March 1912. Translation: William E. Bohn. Transcription/Markup: Micah Muer, 2017. The elections to the German Reichstag have resulted in a great victory for the Social Democratic Party. In 1907 the Socialists entered the national assembly with 43 members, and by means of victories at by-elections this number was raised to 53. The great electoral battle of 1912, however, gives us quite a different story to tell. The first ballot, on January 12, gave the Socialists 67 seats, of which 25 represent newly conquered districts. The party of the working-class was, moreover, left as contestant in 121 reballotings. The second elections have netted 43 seats. Thus the Social Democratic g... (From: Marxists.org.)
Publication: Politics, Vol. III, No 8, September 1946, p. 270-272; Transcribed: by David Walters/Greg Adargo, December, 2001; Source: Kurasje Council Communist Archives. In former issues of Politics the problem has been posed: Why did the working class fail in its historical task? Why did it not offer resistance to national socialism in Germany? Why is there no trace of any revolutionary movement among the workers of America? What has happened to the social vitality of the world working class? Why do the masses all over the globe no longer seem capable of initiating anything new aimed at their own self-liberation? Some light may be thrown upon this problem by the following considerations. It is easy to ask: why did not the workers ri... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: ? Published: 1927 Transcriber: Collective Action Notes (CAN) HTML: Jonas Holmgren In the person of Hermann Gorter, the revolutionary proletariat has just lost one of its most faithful friends and one of its most notable comrades in arms. He figured among the greatest experts in Marxist theory and was one of the very few who, through conflicts and splits, remained invariably devoted to revolutionary communism. Gorter was born on November 26, 1864, the son of a well-known writer; upon completing his studies in the humanities, he was appointed institute professor of secondary education. While still young he composed Mei ("May"), a work of poetry which had an explosive impact on the world of letters in Holland and was immediate... (From: Marxists.org.)
Published: Living Marxism, vol. 4, no. 5. November 1938. Transcribed David Walters/Greg Adargo, December, 2001. Organization is the chief principle in the working class fight for emancipation. Hence the forms of this organization constitute the most important problem in the practice of the working class movement. It is clear that these forms depend on the conditions of society and the aims of the fight. They cannot be the invention of theory, but have to be built up spontaneously by the working class itself, guided by its immediate necessities. With expanding capitalism the workers first built their trade unions. The isolated worker was powerless against the capitalist; so he had to unite with his fellows in bargaining and fighting ov... (From: Marxists.org.)
Written: February 1919 Transcribed: Adam Buick. In the December 1918 Socialist Standard we stated that if a General Election were held in Germany the working class there, having the vast majority of the votes, could place a Socialist Government in power should they desire to work for the establishment of Socialism. An Election has now been held, and its results must be exceedingly disappointing to those who claim that the riots in Berlin and other towns showed that the German working class were ready — nay, eager — to see Socialism brought into existence. The Press reports give the following as the result of the Election: Majority Socialists164 seatsIndependent Socialists24 seatsGerman Democratic Party77 seatsNational Peo... (From: Marxists.org.)
Written: 1918; Source: Workers Dreadnought, 24 May 1919, reprinted from The Revolutionary Age; Transcribed: by Adam Buick. The logical result of the collapse of German Imperialism following the military defeat, was the revolution. On November 4th the revolt in Kiel occurred. The ferment manifested itself first among the sailors. Rumors of revolt among the sailors were heard during the past year, and the Independent Social Democrats defended themselves against the accusations of complicity. Now it broke out anew, stronger and more general, “by mistake” as the Vossiche Zeitung said. Revolutions often occur through such mistakes - the conviction among the sailors that the fleet was ordered out to hopeless combat. The sailor... (From: Marxists.org.)
Published: International Socialist Review, vol. 15, no. 8. February 1915. Translation: Alfred D. Schoch. Transcription/Markup: Micah Muer, 2017. A terrible breakdown of the German social democracy — and of the Socialist movement in the other countries — came when the European war broke out. Before that German socialism seemed full size and full strength, admired by the Socialists of the world as an example no other country had been able to equal; those who knew how things were on the inside, however, were aware that not everything was as good and strong as it seemed. Now all socialism seems suddenly to have disappeared; now it is commonly believed in foreign countries that the entire party, filled with enthusiasm for the ... (From: Marxists.org.)
Suddenly, like a meteor from the sky or an earthquake, the world-war has broken out over the unsuspecting and terrified nations of Europe. No one thought of war, no one really wanted it, princes and cabinet members were traveling or at bathing places — out came the ultimatum of Austria to the Servian government, and after a week of strenuous efforts to preserve peace the nations one after the other slid down into the abyss as if drawn by an irresistible fate. Never before was it made so plain that mankind does not make history according to its own will but is driven by external social forces more powerful than itself. Superficial newspaper writers seek to lay the blame on individual persons. One alleges as the cause of the war the am... (From: Marxists.org.)
If it were necessary to believe the words of the spokesmen of the bourgeoisie, the working class has no worse enemies than the socialists. “For they speak out against the vices of current society,” they say, “ and lament the unhappy lot of the workers, but instead of thinking to bringing them immediate assistance they show the proletarian, in the future, a socialist society that, incidentally, will never be realized. Only those who, like us, place themselves on the terrain of the current order and who hold it to be eternal can dedicate themselves with ardor to the improvement, through means of reforms, of the conditions that exist today. And this is why all of us, liberals and anti-Semites, progressives and Catholic Christ... (From: Marxists.org.)
Published: Unsigned in "Persdienst van de Groep van Internationale Communisten", 1933, no. 7, at the same time as the article Destruction As A Means Of Struggle. This translation was published in the International Communist Current journal Internationalism, No. 20, Summer 1979. Transcriber: John Gray Proofread: Andy Carloff HTML: Jonas Holmgren Many divergent positions have been taken up on the burning of the Reichstag by Van Der Lubbe. In the organs of the communist left (Spartacus, Radencommunist) it was approved as the act of a revolutionary communist. To approve and applaud such an act means calling for it to be repeated. That's why it's important to understand what use it had. Its only meaning could be to hit, to weaken, the r... (From: Marxists.org.)
Published: International Council Correspondence, vol. 1, no. 12. October 1935. Transcription/Markup: Micah Muer, 2017. The intellectual middle class, the engineers, scientists, technical employes, etc. are a necessary part of industrial production, quite as indispensable as the workers themselves. Technical progress, in replacing workers by machines, tends to increase their number. Therefore their class interests and their class character must be of increasing importance in the social struggles. Their growing numbers reflect the growing importance of science and theory in the production of life necessities. In a communist society all will partake of scientific knowledge. In capitalist society it is the privilege and the specialty [sic... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: Letter to Sylvia Pankhurst in Workers’ Dreadnought, 30 September 1922. Transcribed: by Adam Buick. Dear Comrade I have read with much satisfaction your article on the program of the Irish Communist Party, and I think you are perfectly right in calling it a non-Communist program. Indeed, the essence of Communist thought is that the great transformation of society from Capitalism to Communism can only be accomplished by the common efforts of the workers themselves, all of them acting where they stand in the process of production. The belief that some foreign power, the State, may accomplish it for the workers by decrees and laws is a social-democratic belief — nay, only the most narrow-minded social democrats believe... (From: Marxists.org.)
The relation of labor unions to the Socialist movement is in many countries the subject of sharp differences of opinion, even of bitter strife. The situation is by no means everywhere the same. In England, for example, after the breakup of the Chartist political movement in 1848 the union movement increased greatly and became a mighty organization of the workingmen. But this great body of workers remained indifferent to Socialism, or even inimical to it, and the Socialist party remained a small sect. In America the labor movement developed according to the English pattern. In Germany and Belgium, on the contrary, the situation is exactly reversed. There the Socialist party grew mightily in the first place; then the workers, who had learned ... (From: Marxists.org.)
How Mach’s idea could acquire importance in the Russian socialist movement, may be understood from social conditions. The young Russian intelligentsia, owing to the barbarous pre-capitalist conditions, had not yet, as in Western Europe, found its social function in the service of a bourgeoisie. So it had to aspire for the downfall of Czarism, and to join the socialist party. At the same time it stood in spiritual intercourse with the Western intellectuals and so took part in the spiritual trends of the Western world. Thus it was inevitable that efforts should be made to combine them with Marxism. Of course Lenin had to oppose these tendencies. Marxian theory, indeed, can gain nothing essential from Mach. Insofar as a better understan... (From: Marxists.org.)
Written: 1952; Transcribed: by David Walters/Greg Adargo, December, 2001; Source: Kurasje Council Communist Archives. I would like to make some critical and complementary remarks about Comrade Kondor's observations on "Bourgeois or Socialist Organization" in the issue of "Funken" for December 1951. When firstly he criticizes the present-day role of the trade unions (and parties), he is completely right. With the changes in the economic structure the function of the different social structures must also change. The trade unions were and are indispensable as organs of struggle for the working-class under private capitalism. Under monopoly and state-capitalism, towards which capitalism increasingly develops, they turn into a part of the ... (From: Marxists.org.)
Autumn 1946 Amsterdam Dear Comrade. My friend, Paul Mattick, advised me to get into communication with you in order to investigate the possibility of publishing a book on the new aspect of working class movement. Under the influence of the depression and confusion in the 1920’ies among the socialist and labor groups, there arose in a group of leftist militants in Holland (connected with friends in Germany, England and France) the opinion that this crisis and apparent decline was in reality a transition and preliminary to the real coming fight for worker’s freedom. Whereas all socialist writers proclaim as their goal State-socialism, where the workers are dominated and commanded by managers in the shops, by a bureaucracy ... (From: Marxists.org.)
Anton Pannekoek Letter to J.A. Dawson October 12, 1947 Holland October 12, 1947 Dear Comrade Dawson, I thank you very much for your letter of Sept. 16th, wherein you consent to my proposal to publish The Workers’ Councils, eventually; in parts as part of your monthly. So I send to-morrow the first part of the MSS. by sea-mail. It will take probably some months to reach you. ... When you publish it, I must make one very strict condition: That proof-reading is made with utmost care. Because of the distance I, of course, cannot make the proofreading myself; so I cannot take care that everything is correct. So I have carefully scrutinized the manuscript, that every letter and every comma is correct; you know that in English... (From: Marxists.org.)
[The following text is that of J.A. Dawson's containing extracts from Pannekoek's letter in citation marks] A recent letter from Dr. Anton Pannekoek contains such sound logic that I feel it should be passed along to all workers seeking the way to emancipation. Dr. Pannekoek writes me that he and his fellow Dutch workers have now hopes that their book (See S.S.R. December issue) will be published by a leading publishing house in London. Inter alia, he mentions that comrade Harris, of Newport, Socialist Party of Great Britain, has contacted him and offered an assurance of help by the Party in furthering the matter if negotiations with the particular publishing house fall through. Comrades in Australia will be heartened in our fight that su... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: Socialisme ou Barbarie, No 14, April-June 1954; Written: November 8, 1953; Translated: for Marxists.org by Mitch Abidor. Dear Comrade Chaulieu, I offer you many thanks for the series of eleven issues of Socialisme ou Barbarie that you gave to comrade B.... to give to me. I read them (though I haven’t yet finished) with great interest, because of the great agreement between us that they reveal. You probably remarked the same thing when reading my book Les Conseils ouvriers. For many years it seemed to me that the small number of socialists who expounded these ideas hadn’t grown; the book was ignored and was met with silence by almost the entire socialist press (except, recently, in the Socialist Leader of the ILP).... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: Neubestimmung des Marxismus 1: Diskussion über Arbeiterräte, Berlin (West): Karin Kramer Verlag, 1974, pp. 27-30. Published: ‘Liberaler und imperialistischer Marxismus,’ Lichtstrahlen, nr. 7, 1915 Transcriber: Daniel Gaido Translation: Daniel Gaido, 2009 In this essay Pannekoek takes issue with the so-called ‘radical imperialist’ wing of the SPD—a group of extreme social-patriots that developed during the First World War and included some prominent former defenders of ‘orthodoxy’ and left-wingers such as Paul Lensch, Heinrich Cunow, Max Cohen and Konrad Haenisch.[2] It draws an interesting analogy with the so-called ‘Legal Marxists’ in Russia who ultimately bec... (From: Marxists.org.)
Written: 1909 Translated: 1912, Nathan Weiser. Transcribed: Jon Muller HTML Markup: Abu Nicole, proofed and corrected by Bas Streef; Source: Charles H. Kerr & Company, Chicago, USA Original Copyright, 1912. CONTENTS Darwinism Marxism Marxism and the Class Struggle Darwinism and the Class Struggle Darwinism versus Socialism Natural Law and Social Theory The Sociability of Man Tools, Thought and Language Animal Organs and Human Tools Capitalism and Socialism I. Darwinism Two scientists can hardly be named who have, in the second half of the 19th century, dominated the human mind to a greater degree than Darwin and Marx. Their teachings revolutionized the conception that the great masses had about the world. F... (From: Marxists.org.)

1 2 3