Benjamin R. Tucker: American Father of Individualist Anarchism

April 17, 1854 — June 22, 1939

Revolt Library People Benjamin R. Tucker

Not Logged In: Login?

0
0
Comments (0)
Images (2)
Quotes (6)
Works (48)
Permalink

An individualist Anarchist, Tucker (1854Ð1939) was a person of intellect rather than of action, focusing on the development of his ideas and on the publication of books and journals, especially the journal Liberty: Not the Daughter but the Mother of Order...

Top Tags :

From : Anarchy Archives

"It has ever been the tendency of power to add to itself, to enlarge its sphere, to encroach beyond the limits set for it..."

From : "State Socialism and Anarchism," by Benjamin R. Tucker, 1888


On : of 0 Words

About Benjamin R. Tucker

 Benjamin R. Tucker 1

Benjamin R. Tucker 1

Introduced to Anarchism, labor reform, and free love by Ezra Heywood in Massachusetts, Tucker was also particularly influenced by Josiah Warren.  An individualist Anarchist, Tucker (1854-1939) was a person of intellect rather than of action, focusing on the development of his ideas and on the publication of books and journals, especially the journal Liberty:  Not the Daughter but the Mother of Order (1881-1908).  Tucker summarized his philosophy by stating, "The Anarchists are simply unterrified Jeffersonian Democrats. They believe that 'the best government is that which governs least,' and that which governs least is no government at all. Besides publishing the writings of the leading individualist anarchists and many other radicals, Liberty was probably the earliest American magazine to publish Nietzsche and George Bernard Shaw.  Besides Liberty, Tucker operated an ambitious book publishing program.  He translated into English and published a long list of radical works, including What is Property?, of Pierre Joseph Proudhon.  He also translated and published Bakunin's God and the State, Chernyshevsky's What Is To Be Done? and Tolstoy's The Kreutzer Sonata.  He published Max Stirner's The Ego and His Own, as well as works by Oscar Wilde, Herbert Spencer, Emile Zola, John Henry Mackay, and many others.  After a disastrous fire in New York City in 1908 destroyed his warehouse and Unique Book Shop, Tucker left the United States for France, where he lived for the remainder of his life.

From : Anarchy Archives

Works

Back to Top

This person has authored 334 documents, with 793,441 words or 4,951,690 characters.

1900
Decidedly, autumn is here. Frosts which were not expected so soon have browned the last flowers of the garden. The dahlias, the poor dahlias, witnesses of Monsieur’s amorous timidity, are dried up; dried up also are the big sunflowers that mounted guard at the kitchen-door. There is nothing left in the devastated flower-beds,—nothing but a few sorry-looking geraniums here and there, and five or six clusters of asters, whose blue flowers—the dull blue of rottenness—are bending toward the ground in anticipation of death. The garden-plots of Captain Mauger, whom I saw just now over the hedge, present a scene of veritable disaster, and everything is of the color of tobacco. The trees, through the fields, are begin... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
1895
[introduction by translator, Benjamin R. Tucker] In two recent issues of “La Nouvelle Revue” (February 1 and 15) appears a remarkable article under the above title from the pen of Edmond Lepelletier, embodying an outline sketch, left by Proudhon and now for the first time published, of a play which he had in contemplation, to be entitled “Galileo: A Philosophical Drama in Four Acts and Five Tableaux.” As no one bad dreamed of Proudhon as a dramatist, this is a surprising revelation. The article opens with a summary biographical sketch of Proudhon, which, in point of fact, contains nothing new, and, in point of opinion of Proudhon’s work, goes nearly to the ordinary extent of misconception. Indeed, nothin... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
1908
Liberty's Declaration of Purpose Excerpted from the book; Individual Liberty Selections From the Writings of Benjamin R. Tucker Vanguard Press, New York, 1926 Kraus Reprint Co., Millwood, NY, 1973. Volume 1, No. 1, of Liberty appeared on August 6, 1881 and here is its salutatory: LIBERTY enters the field of journalism to speak for herself because she finds no one willing to speak for her. She hears no voice that always champions her; she knows no pen that always writes in her defense; she sees no hand that is always lifted to avenge her wrongs or vindicate her rights. Many claim to speak in her name, but few really understand her. Still fewer have the courage and the opportunity to consistently fig... (From: Flag.Blackened.net.)
1897
A Spirit More Evil Than Alcohol.[Liberty, August 13, 1887.] The authority of learning, the tyranny of science, which Bakounine foresaw, deprecated, and denounced, never found blunter expression than in an article by T. B. Wakeman in the August number of the Freethinkers’ Magazine in which the writer endeavors to prove, on scientific grounds alone, that alcohol is an evil, a poison that ought never to be taken into the human system. My knowledge of chemistry and physiology is too limited to enable me to judge of the scientific soundness of the attempted demonstration; but I do know that it is admirably well written, wonderfully attractive, powerfully plausible, important if true, and therefore worthy of answer by those wh... (From: fair-use.org.)
1889
It was disappointing to the Stary Tchert (Old Devil) that the brothers did not quarrel over the division of the property, and that they separated peacefully; and he cried out, calling his three small devils (Tchertionki). “See here,” said he, “there are living three brothers—Simeon the soldier, Tarras-Briukhan, and Ivan the Fool. It is necessary that they should quarrel. Now they live peacefully, and enjoy each other’s hospitality. The Fool spoiled all my plans. Now you three go and work with them in such a manner that they will be ready to tear each other’s eyes out. Can you do this?” “We can,&rdquo... (From: Gutenberg.org.)
1907
Feb 19, 1907 Dear Mr. [George] Schumm: As to the sentence about the rich and the poor giving up themselves, I was to blame for the false rendering. But now that I know from you the meaning, I know also that both you and Byington conspicuously fail to express that meaning. I do not understand, however, why Stirner should say such a thing. I thought the whole purpose of the book was to show that it is not beneficially to anybody to give up themselves. I now render it as follows (and, if wrong, should be corrected at once ): “Why should the rich let go their fleeces and give up themselves , though a similar course could be followed advantageously by the poor?” When I see you (next Saturday evening why I... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
1936
Source: Benjamin R.Tucker Papers, New York Public Library; Transcribed: by Mitchell Abidor. Villa “a Lujerneta" Pont Ste Devote Principality of Monaco April 11,1936 To the Editor of the American Journal of Sociology: The University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. Sir: In view of the tissue of falsehoods (I purposely refrain from saying “lies” by the advice of a beloved friend and the cautious Webster) that you have printed about me in your issue of January 1936, there is little wonder that you do not wish to be addressed individually. But, whoever you may be, I shall not allow you to escape responsibility, since I know that the writer knows, and therefore writes with malice prepense. If his air of cold impartiality ... (From: Marxists.org.)
1927
c/o Carlone. 8, ave de Verdun Nice (A-M) France Feb 25, 1927 Mr. Samuel Roth, Two Worlds Publishing: Sir: A friend of mine in America has sent me a copy of the “Two Worlds Monthly” containing the first installment of my translation of “A Chambermaid’s Diary.” It is perfectly proper to publish my translation, but it is decidedly improper to do so without accompanying it with my name as translator. In fact, such conduct is an indecency beneath contempt. The example has been set by the house of Mali and Liverwrong, which has recently split up. Perhaps you are yourself the offshoot. The fact of multiplication by mere splitting up is characteristic of the order of protozoa, ...
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, these three; but the greatest of these is Liberty. Formerly the price of Liberty was eternal vigilance, but now it can be had for fifty cents a year. Individuals on becoming adults gain their freedom. Are nations never to attain their majority? The effect of one-half of our laws is to make criminals; the purpose of the other half is to punish them. Holding a monopoly, the banker is the worst enemy of the human race, being its chief despoiler; without that monopoly, he is its best fri... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. “Liberty is coming,” says the New York “Truth-Seeker.” A mistake; Liberty has come. Hon Elizur Wright was among the callers at the “Index” office last week. — Free Religious Index. The time when this was an occurrence too common to be noted is not yet beyond the memory of man. Ireland aside, but little is known in America, even among radicals, of the rapid strides and interesting phases of reform and revolution in Europe. As opportunity offers, Liberty’s crowded columns will be ma... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Whatever is is natural; therefore, there can be nothing supernatural. Wages is not slavery. Wages is a form of voluntary exchange, and voluntary exchange is a form of Liberty. Henry Maret, the bravest and most consistent writer for the daily press of Paris, has started a daily journal of his own, called the “Radical.” Success to it. Henry Ward Beecher says the great vices of politics are lying and whiskey. Judging by the Plymouth preacher, the great vices of religion are lying and “nest-hiding.” ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Society has no rights. Morality is the science of mutual rights and duties of human beings. Liberty attempts to promote unanimity by consent, and succeeds; authority attempts to promote it by compulsion, and succeeds — in retarding it. “A Socialist,” who lately joined in the New York “Truth’s” hunt for the “Somebody,” is on the right scent when he says that the right of property as defined by Proudhon must be superseded by the right of possession. Some political phil... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Legislation is usurpation. Those who would abolish poverty by reducing the hours of labor put the cart before the horse. The people are poor, not because they receive low wages, but because they give their credit away and buy it back. Liberty owes her readers an apology for the slight delay in the appearance of this number. Hereafter our mailing day will be Friday, one day later than heretofore. One of our Greenback exchanges says that “every man who has a ballot and fails to use it in defense of American li... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. A law against blasphemy is its own violation; for, if there be a God, those who presume to add to his laws are the worst of blasphemers. Those who would have the usurer rewarded for rendering a service always find it convenient to forget that the usurer’s victims would not need his service were it not that the laws made at his bidding prevent them from serving themselves. “The death of President Garfield has done more to kill the incipient poison that Col. Bob Ingersoll inoculated in the minds of the American people... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Ireland’s disgrace: Cashel’s Grace. Ireland’s lesson: Put not your trust in priests. Ireland’s Benedict Arnold: the infamous, traitorous, cowardly Croke. Ireland’s foremost man and real leader: Michael Davitt, the first of her sons at home to ask his countrymen to join with him in the abolition of that “immoral tax,” rent. Ireland’s chief danger: the liability of her people — besotted with superstition; trampled on by tyranny; ground into the dust beneath the w... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Judge Black, in replying to Ingersoll, says: “The most perfect system of human government that ever was invented by the wit of man, and the holiest religion that has revealed to his creatures, when united together, form a monstrous compound highly injurious to the best interests of the human race.” To be sure! What else could be expected? Is not the character of a compound determined by the character of its ingredients? Revealed religion is an evil; human government is an evil: how could a mixture of the two be anything but evil?... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. Michael Bakunin. As announced in our last number, we present on this page, for the first time in America, a faithful portrait of the founder of Nihilism,— the physical lineaments of an heroic reformer, of whom we are willing to hazard the judgment that coming history will yet place him in the very front ranks of the world’s great social saviors. The grand head and face speak for themselves regarding the immense energy, lofty character, and innate nobility of the man. We should have esteemed it among the chief honors of our life to have known him... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Without unrestricted competition there can be no true cooperation. The Boston “Investigator” offers itself to trial subscribers for one month for twenty-five cents. The paper has a glorious record, and all Liberals should unite in rewarding its valiant struggle against superstition by stanch support in its honorable and still vigorous old age. Herbert Spencer, though he knows nothing of Proudhon’s ideas and made a complete fool of himself on the only occasion when he ever undertook to criticize them, is as muc... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. It is not surprising to hear that Henry George regards Liberty as “cranky.” All the defenders of despotism do. Since European socialists began to circulate their revolutionary literature in hermetically-sealed cans of condensed milk, that heretofore mild and inoffensive commodity has become a greater terror to the “effete monarchies” than dynamics. “Irish landlordism,” says Nasby, “is condensed villainy.” So it is. And landlordism of whatever nationality is villainy also, however ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. Macaulay was right. Liberty is her own physician, and cures her own ills. A king once said: “I require a prudent and able man, who is capable of managing the State affairs of my kingdom.” An ex-minister replied: “The criterion, O Sire! of a wise and competent man is that he will not meddle with such matters.” The sonnet to Liberty in another column was sent to us by that Veteran reformer, John M. Spear, of Philadelphia. Speaking spiritualistically, he tells us that Garrison wrote it. We prefer to attribute it to Mr. Spear ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. George Chainey’s “Infidel Pulpit” now comes to us under the title, “This World.” It presents a very handsome appearance, and we are glad to hear that it is achieving an abundant success. William W. Crapo, who represents the first congressional district of Massachusetts in the national house of representatives, is soon to report, in his capacity of chairman of the committee on banking and currency, a bill drafted by himself extending the national banking system for another twenty years. Mr. Crapo is popula... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. An East Indian paper says that a number of Italian builders have gone to Mandalay, where King Thebaw is ambitious of having a chapel erected which shall be similar to St. Peter’s at Rome. The heathen monarch evidently deems himself “a biger man” than the pope. Cyrus W. Field, whose fears of communism are said to cause him much loss of sleep, announces, through his new organ, the “Mail and Express,” the discovery of forty thousand socialists in the city of New York who are waiting an opportunity to seize h... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. “Society,” some one has truly said, “is produced by our wants, and government by our wickedness.” The New England “Methodist” illustrates the singular unwillingness of O. B. Frothingham to define his position, in view of the fact that he has avowed a new one, by the story of the Irish lad who fell into a deep well, and, when his father called to know if he were dead, replied: “Not dead, father, bat spacheless.” An exchange tells us that a rich Italian land-owner resorts to an obso... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. The Nihilist appeal lately published in these columns for the tires time in America has resulted rather disastrously for one of its authors, the expulsion of Pierre Lavroff from French territory having been demanded by Russia and granted by the new De Freycinet ministry. An enthusiastic Chicago correspondent of the Louisville “Courier-Journal” predicts that George C. Miln, the latest acquisition from the pulpit to the infidel ranks, within two years will be “recognized throughout America as the greatest leader known ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. We are now prepared to furnish the portrait of Michael Bakunin (published in Liberty several weeks ago) separately and on large, heavy paper. It ought to adorn the library walls of every true radical. Consult our advertising column for further information. The Philadelphia “Press” refers to the British house of commons as a “band of chuckle-headed dullards.” So exact an appreciation of the tools of the governing classes is worthy of Liberty, who hastens to acknowledge her encouragement at hearing her opinions e... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. “Conduct,” well says the editor of the “Index,” “must have beneath it a logical basis of rationality, or else it has no validity.” But in that case what an appalling amount of invalid conduct will the “Index” have to answer for, if its efforts in behalf of law-made virtue shall materially increase the amount of that shoddy product in a moral market already overstocked! Auberon Herbert, the radical English nobleman, says in a recent letter to the London “Daily News”: “I ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Of the ten Nihilists recently sentenced to death the czar pardoned five in response to the appeal of Victor Hugo. Thereupon the French poet — to his shame be it said! — drank to the health of the czar in the presence of a company of Parisian journalists. This so tickled the czar’s vanity that he straightway pardoned four more of them. What playthings are men in the hands of monarche, their lives dependent upon a passing caprice! Brown of Boston, aided by other workingmen, has issued an edition of & radical pamphl... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. To-morrow is the birthday of Robert Owen, the man who did more perhaps than any other to give impulse to the consideration of industrial wrongs. All friends of labor should unite in doing honor to his memory. Prince Kropotkin is to lecture in the principal cities of England and Scotland for the benefit of the Red Cross fund. His letters recently written to the Newcastle “Chronicle,” Joseph Cowen’s newspaper, containing fresh, interesting, and valuable information concerning the situation in Russia, are soon to appear... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. In consequence of the Dublin murder, Mr. Gladstone has introduced a bill “for the repression of crime in Ireland.” We wish this most excellent purpose might be carried out, and would suggest to Mr. Gladstone that the first crime he should attempt to repress is one of about seven hundred years’ standing. Until this first and great crime shall be repressed, we think all his other effort to repress crime in Ireland will be labor lost. The “Index-Appeal” of Petersburg, Virginia, says that “there is no k... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. The detestable tendency of superstition to make the observance of its ceremonies a duty paramount to that of respect for human rights and to regard its factitious “sins against God” as morally more enormous than sins against man is not unfairly illustrated, if perhaps a little exaggerated, by the story recently told in the British house of commons by Sir Wilfred Lawson of a father who said to his son: “Now my boy, beware of the beginning of sin! Many a man has commenced with murder and ended with Sabbath-breaking.” ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Let every subscriber read the notice printed in italics at the head of our editorial page. Davitt says that he “favors the compensation of the landlords, not on principle, but as a practical politician.” The great glory of Davitt’s life hitherto has been his ideal championship of principles. As a “practical politician” he will sink into deserved insignificance. John Swinton’s withering denunciation of lawyers, printed in another column, cannot be commended too highly as a flery and luminous i... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. John Hay. On Picket Duty. Thomas Jefferson, were be alive today, would probably be an Anarchist. His philosophy pointed straight in the direction of absolute Liberty. In this connection one of the most interesting of his sayings that inscribed by him on the desk on which the Declaration of Independence was written: “Politics, as well as religion, has its superstitions.” Lady Brassey mentions that in one of the South Sea islands the missionaries had to substitute coconut milk for wine, as the cup never reached the third communicant ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. John Hay. On Picket Duty. The campaign in Egypt is simply one more phase of the modern universal struggle between the people and the usurers. “Free thought,” says the Philadelphia “Evening News,” “is a glorious thing — in theory; but in practice it is a good deal like free love, free trade, and free rum.” Exactly so; and therefore a glorious thing in practice too. Postmaster-General Howe has written a letter in which he says that hereafter he shall rule out of the mails on the ground of obscenit... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. John Hay. On Picket Duty. The Malden “Headlight” accuses the editor of Liberty of bad generalship in placing his heaviest guns “on picket duty.” Professor Huxley says that “extinguished theologians lie about the cradle of every science, like strangled snakes beside that of Hercules.” Talmage says that “God is not an Anarchist.” Of course not. Being the source and strength of all hierarchies, how could he be an Anarchist? Is he not the king of kings, the lord of lords, the tyrant of tyrants... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. Road Liberty’s splendid offer of premiums to new subscribers in another column. “Leaves of Grass” is now sold openly by nearly all the Boston booksellers. We have won our victory, and the “guardians of Massachusetts morality” have ignominiously retreated. This is well; but much trouble would have been saved, if the cowardly Osgoods had only stood up in their shoes, instead of surrendering without a struggle. The woman suffragists of Boston met at Mrs. Fenno Tudor’s a few days ago, and voted despite ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” — John Hay. On Picket Duty. P. J. McGuire’s paper, “The Carpenter,” has been removed from New York, and will hereafter be published at 613 Callowhill Street, Philadelphia. Society may do what it pleases, and the individual may do what he pleases if society pleases to let him, say the State Socialists. Liberty says that the Individual may do what he pleases, and society may do what it pleases if the individuals comprising the society please to let it. Between these two positions there can be neither peace nor compromise. It is becoming th... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
“For always in thine eyes, O Liberty! Shines that high light whereby the world is saved; And though thou slay us, we will trust in thee.” John Hay. On Picket Duty. The truest and most important thing said by General Butler during his recent campaign for the governorship was this: “You hear about men making money; they get it away from each other. It is all produced from the soil at first.” This is a simple, plain, and forcible way of saying that interest, rent, and profit are dishonest abstractions from the pockets of labor. Liberty scarcely gets a fair show in the “North American Review” discussion concerning the suppression of obscene literature between Anthony Comstock... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
1889
“Then came Peter to Him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times?” . . . . “So likewise shall My heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not every one his brother their trespasses.”—ST. MATTHEW xviii., 21-35. In a certain village there lived a peasant by the name of Ivan Scherbakoff. He was prosperous, strong, and vigorous, and was considered the hardest worker in the whole village. He had three sons, who supported themselves by their own labor. The eldest was married, the second about to be married, and the youngest took care of the horses and occasionally attended to the plowing. The peasant’s wife, Ivano... (From: Archive.org.)
1848
Dr. Malthus, an economist, an Englishman, once wrote the following words: “A man who is born into a world already possessed, if he cannot get subsistence from his parents on whom he has a just demand, and if the society do not want his labor, has no claim of right to the smallest portion of food, and, in fact, has no business to be where he is. At nature’s mighty feast there is no vacant cover for him. She tells him to be gone, and will quickly execute her own orders...”[1] As a consequence of this great principle, Malthus recommends, with the most terrible threats, every man who has neither labor nor income upon which to live to take himself away, or at any rate to have no more children. A family, — that is, love,... (From: anarchism.pageabode.com.)
1914
Dec 23, 1914 Dear Labadie; Bool says that you wish to know my reasons for favoring the Allies. I favor the Allies because I pity the Belgian people, because I admire the British influences that make or liberty, because I feel some (tho I regret to say a decreasing) concern for the future of the American people, because I have considerable sympathy or the people of Russia, and because I hate and fear the German people as a nation of domineering brutes bent on turning the whole world into a police-ridden paradise of the Prussian pattern. I have numerous other reasons for favoring the allies, but the above is the main reason and a sufficient one. You see, I don’t love everybody as you and Bool do. My love is limited ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
1914
October 2, 1914 London Dear Mr Schumm: I have heard from the Hetzels (as indeed you have written me yourself) that you think me mistaken regarding Nietzsche’s responsibility for the war. I enclose a letter from wm. Archer to Gerhardt Hauptmann, showing that not only archer, but Hauptmann himself, takes my view. How do you account for the writings of Treitschke, Bernhardi, H. S. Chamberlain, and others? Are not these evidently an outgrowth of the reading of Nietzsche? And have these not dictated the military policy of Germany? It is no answer to argue that Nietzsche meant this, or that, or the other. The apologists for E.G. use the same argument when confronted with the acts of her disciples. In both cases t... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
1935
January 3, 1935 To my dear friends Rose Freeman Ishill and Joseph Ishill: Great and glorious was my surprise at receiving yesterday the three beautiful booklets, for which you have my heartfelt thanks. Cunninghame Graham has long been an object of my especial admiration, though I have not the honor of his acquaintance. But a notable occasion marks my memory of [William] Morris. In his home at Hammersmith, in 1889, I sat one Sunday evening at a midnight supper. Morris himself was alone, at the head of the table. At his right sat Belfort Bax, whom thirty-five years later I knew intimately at Nice. I sat at Bax’s right, and at my right sat May Morris. Opposite her sat her lover, Sparling, and at his right, opposite B... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
Probably no agitation has ever attained the magnitude, either in the number of its recruits or the area of its influence, which has been attained by Modern Socialism, and at the same time been so little understood and so misunderstood, not only by the hostile and the indifferent, but by the friendly, and even by the great mass of its adherents themselves. This unfortunate and highly dangerous state of things is due partly to the fact that the human relationships which this movement – if anything so chaotic can be called a movement – aims to transform, involve no special class or classes, but literally all mankind; partly to the fact that these relationships are infinitely more varied and complex in their nature than those with w...
1849
The Revolution of February raised two leading questions: one economic, the question of labor and property; the other political, the question of government or the State. On the first of these questions the socialistic democracy is substantially in accord. They admit that it is not a question of the seizure and division of property, or even of its repurchase. Neither is it a question of dishonorably levying additional taxes on the wealthy and property-holding classes, which, while violating the principle of property recognized in the constitution, would serve only to overturn the general economy and aggravate the situation of the proletariat. The economic reform consists, on the one hand, in opening usurious credit to competition and thereby... (From: proudhonlibrary.org.)
1927
November 25, 1927 Dear Mr. Schumm: I wrote you of the proposition of the National Institute for the Blind regarding ‘The Ego and His Own.’ It turns out to be a bit less encouraging than the first letters to Fifield indicated. Not bad, though, after all. What it amounts to is this; a copy is to be cut in raised type, by hand, by a volunteer, for Helen Keller, and a duplicate is to be put in the general library of raised type for the blind. I suppose, then, that Helen Keller is interested, or, if not, that some enthusiastic person hopes to interest her. One sees now in Russia the perfect realization of “peace at any price,’ a land that knows not hate, the flowering of the gospel of universal love, ... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
Why am I an Anarchist? That is the question which the editor of the Twentieth Century has requested me to answer for his readers. I comply; but, to be frank, I find it a difficult task. If the editor or one of his contributors had only suggested a reason why I should be anything other than an Anarchist, I am sure I should have no difficulty in disputing the argument. And does not this very fact, after all, furnish in itself the best of all reasons why I should be an Anarchist – namely, the impossibility of discovering any good reason for being anything else? To show the invalidity of the claims of State Socialism, Nationalism, Communism, Single-taxism, the prevailing capitalism, and all the numerous forms of Archism existing or propos...
1907
May 2, 1907 Dear Mr. Schumm: I am expecting you as usual next Saturday evening. I have just read with interest your well-written letter in tonight’s “Post,” but I don’t agree with it. It seems to me idealistic, based on illusion. A proposal that the United States, for instance, should straightaway abolish its army and navy must be made either by one who does, or by one who does not, value the national existence as such. Your comparison with Roosevelt, since it implies a comparison of different means with a view to one and the same end, indicates that in the “Post” you are arguing from the position of one who does not value the national existence, for that of course is the end t... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)
1887
Van Buren Denslow, discussing in the Truth Seeker the comparative rewards of labor and capital, points out that the present wage system divides profits about evenly between the two, instancing the railways of Illinois, which pay annually in salaries and wages $81,936,170, and to capital, which Mr. Denslow defines as the "labor previously done in constructing and equipping the roads," $81,720,265. Then he remarks: "No system of intentional profit-sharing is more equal than this, provided we assent to the principle that a day’s work already done and embodied in the form of capital is as well entitled to compensation for its use as a day’s work not yet done, which we call labor." Exactly. But the principle referred to is the very t... (From: TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

Image Gallery of Benjamin R. Tucker

Quotes by Benjamin R. Tucker

Back to Top

"It has ever been the tendency of power to add to itself, to enlarge its sphere, to encroach beyond the limits set for it..."

From : "State Socialism and Anarchism," by Benjamin R. Tucker, 1888

"...Anarchism, which may be described as the doctrine that all the affairs of men should be managed by individuals or voluntary associations, and that the State should be abolished."

From : "State Socialism and Anarchism," by Benjamin R. Tucker, 1888

"The evil to which this [tariff] monopoly gives rise might more properly be called misusury than usury, because it compels labor to pay, not exactly for the use of capital, but rather for the misuse of capital."

From : "State Socialism and Anarchism," by Benjamin R. Tucker, 1888

"If the individual has a right to govern himself, all external government is tyranny. Hence the necessity of abolishing the State."

From : "State Socialism and Anarchism," by Benjamin R. Tucker, 1888

"But although, viewing the divine hierarchy as a contradiction of Anarchy, they do not believe in it, the Anarchists none the less firmly believe in the liberty to believe in it. Any denial of religious freedom they squarely oppose."

From : "State Socialism and Anarchism," by Benjamin R. Tucker, 1888

"Even in so delicate a matter as that of the relations of the sexes the Anarchists do not shrink from the application of their principle. They acknowledge and defend the right of any man and woman, or any men and women, to love each other for as long or as short a time as they can, will, or may. To them legal marriage and legal divorce are equal absurdities."

From : "State Socialism and Anarchism," by Benjamin R. Tucker, 1888

Chronology

Back to Top
An icon of a baby.
April 17, 1854
Birth Day.

An icon of a gravestone.
June 22, 1939
Death Day.

An icon of a news paper.
November 16, 2016; 4:52:47 PM (America/Los_Angeles)
Added to https://www.RevoltLib.com.

An icon of a red pin for a bulletin board.
April 21, 2019; 5:06:11 PM (America/Los_Angeles)
Updated on https://www.RevoltLib.com.

Links

Back to Top

Comments

Back to Top

Login through Google to Comment or Like/Dislike :

No comments so far. You can be the first!

Tags

Back to Top

Navigation

Back to Top
<< Last Entry in People
Current Entry in People
Benjamin R. Tucker
Next Entry in People >>
All Nearby Items in People