People : Persons and Individuals Involved with the Revolution

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Total People : 431

Want to know about the people who are responsible for making social change throughout history? Then you're looking in the right place.

By learning about those who fought against injustice in the past, we can learn more about ourselves. The teacher of history has many lessons about overcoming our weaknesses and tempering our strengths.

This archive contains 437 texts, with 90,857 words or 591,922 characters.

Newest Additions

(1861 - 1946) ~ Constance Clara Garnett
Constance Clara Garnett (née Black; 19 December 1861 – 17 December 1946) was an English translator of nineteenth-century Russian literature. She was the first English translator to render numerous volumes of Anton Chekhov's work into English and the first to translate almost all of Fyodor Dostoevsky's fiction into English. She also rendered works by Ivan Turgenev, Leo Tolstoy, Nikolai Gogol, Ivan Goncharov, Alexander Ostrovsky, and Alexander Herzen into English. Altogether, she translated 71 volumes of Russian literature, many of which are still in print today. Garnett was born in Brighton, England, the sixth of the eight children of the solicitor David Black (1817–1892), afterwards town clerk and coroner, and his wife, Clara Maria Patten (1825–1875), daughter of painter George Patten. Her brother was the mathematician Arthur Black, and her sister was the labour organiser and novelist Clementina Black. Her father became paralysed in 1873, and two y... (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1862 - 1933) ~ Marie Isidorovna Goldsmith : Russian, Jewish, Anarchist, Kropotkinist (AKA: Maria Isidine and Maria Korn)
Marie Isidorovna Goldsmith was born to Jewish and Russian ancestry in 1862 or 1863. Her father, Isidor, was a radical publisher in St. Petersburg and her mother, Sofia, was trained in medicine. The family belonged to forbidden organizations. This evidently affected Goldsmith's childhood and mindset therein, though the former was little recorded. They fled Russia for Paris in 1884, where her father died two years later. Goldsmith received a Ph.D. in biology from the Sorbonne in 1915 and published scientific papers. She served as secretary of L'Année Biologique from 1902 to 1919, and worked closely with its editor, Yves Delage, especially after he became nearly blind in 1904. Together they published Les Théories de l'évolution and La Parthénogénèse naturelle et expérimentale. After his death in 1920, Goldsmith struggled to find stable work. During her student years in Paris, Goldsmith joined the Etudiants soc... (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1871 - 1919) ~ Rosa Luxemburg
Rosa Luxemburg (German: [ˈʁoːza ˈlʊksəmbʊʁk] (About this soundlisten); Polish: Róża Luksemburg; also Rozalia Luksenburg; 5 March 1871 – 15 January 1919) was a Polish Marxist, philosopher, economist, anti-war activist and revolutionary socialist who became a naturalized German citizen at the age of 28. Successively, she was a member of the Social Democracy of the Kingdom of Poland and Lithuania (SDKPiL), the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), the Independent Social Democratic Party (USPD) and the Communist Party of Germany (KPD). (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1885 - 1937) ~ Alexander Shliapnikov
Alexander Gavrilovich Shliapnikov (Russian: Алекса́ндр Гаври́лович Шля́пников) (August 30, 1885 – September 2, 1937) was a Russian communist revolutionary, metalworker, and trade union leader. He is best remembered as a memoirist of the October Revolution of 1917 and as the leader of one of the primary opposition movements inside the Russian Communist Party during the 1920s. (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1872 - 1952) ~ Alexandra Kollontai
Alexandra Mikhailovna Kollontai (Russian: Алекса́ндра Миха́йловна Коллонта́й, née Domontovich, Домонто́вич; 31 March [O.S. 19 March] 1872 – 9 March 1952) was a Russian revolutionary, politician, diplomat and Marxist theoretician. Serving as the People's Commissar for Welfare in Vladimir Lenin's government in 1917–1918, she was a highly prominent woman within the Bolshevik party and the first woman in history to become an official member of a governing cabinet. (From : Wikipedia.org.)

Blasts from the Past

(1946 - ) ~ Anarchist Historian and Occupy Activist
Jeremy Brecher is a historian, documentary filmmaker, activist, and author of books on labor and social movements. His notable literary works include Cornwall in Pictures: A Visual reminiscence, 1868-1941, which was favorably reviewed by the New York Times; and Global Village or Global Pillage?, written with Tim Costello. His notable documentary works include Global Village or Global Pillage? which received the Gold Special Jury Award at The Houston International Film Festival, and Best Documentary Award at the FirstGlance 5 Philadelphia Film and Video Festival, and a 2001 Emmy Award Nomination from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Target Audience Program. (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1830 - 1905) ~ Exiled Anarchist Geographer, Environmentalist, and Animal Rights Activist : Reclus was also actively involved in a number of societies during this time, including the Freemasons, the Freethinkers, the International Brotherhood of Michael Bakunin, and a number of anarchist cooperatives. In 1864, Elisée and Elie even helped to co-found the first Rochdale-type cooperative in Paris... (From : Samuel Stephenson Bio.)
• "How can a worker, enrolled by you among the ruling class, be the same as before, since now he can speak in terms of equality with the other oppressors?" (From : "Why Anarchists Don't Vote," by Élisée Reclus.)
• "Everything that can be said about the suffrage may be summed up in a sentence. To vote is to give up your own power. To elect a master or many, for a long or short time, is to resign one's liberty." (From : "Why Anarchists Don't Vote," by Élisée Reclus.)
• "The possession of power has a maddening influence; parliaments have always wrought unhappiness. In ruling assemblies, in a fatal manner, the will prevails of those below the average, both morally and intellectually." (From : "Why Anarchists Don't Vote," by Élisée Reclus.)

(1912 - 1995) ~ Canadian Anarchist Essayist and Literary Critic : ...sought to raise awareness of the revolution in Spain and of what was being achieved by the Spanish working class against great odds. He was a firm believer in the working class's ability to reorganize society along fundamentally democratic and egalitarian lines. (From : Kevin Doyle Bio.)
• "These two centuries [the eighteenth and ninteenth], it should be observed, were those in which capitalism grew to such an extent that it was able to take advantage of the industrial revolution in technique in order to establish its domination over society." (From : "The Tyranny of the Clock," by George Woodcock, 19....)
• "In a sane and free society such an arbitrary domination of man's functions by either clock or machine would obviously be out of the question. The domination of man by the creation of man is even more ridiculous than the domination of man by man." (From : "The Tyranny of the Clock," by George Woodcock, 19....)
• "Only if he is willing to accept of the hazards of living by his faith or his wits can the man without money avoid living as a slave to the clock." (From : "The Tyranny of the Clock," by George Woodcock, 19....)

(1952 - )
Alan Brian Carter (born 1952, Lincolnshire, England) is Emeritus Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow. Carter earned a BA at the University of Kent at Canterbury, a MA at the University of Sussex and a DPhil at St Cross College at the University of Oxford. Carter's first academic position was Lecturer in Political Theory at University College Dublin. He then became Head of the Philosophy Department at Heythrop College, University of London. Subsequently, he was Professor of Philosophy and Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has been a Visiting Professor at the University of British Columbia and at the University of Bucharest. For a number of years Carter was joint editor of the Journal of Applied Philosophy. He works principally in political philosophy, moral philosophy, and environmental philosophy. Carter has published on a wide range of topics: within political philosophy he has written on political obligatio... (From : Wikipedia.org.)

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