Browsing People : Persons and Individuals Involved with the Revolution

Revolt Library People Browsing

Not Logged In: Login?

This archive contains 450 documents, with 104,465 words or 678,751 characters.

Browsing : 301 to 310 of 444

Results Per Page :

Feb. 5, 1846 — Mar. 17, 1906
After being released from jail, Most came to the United States, beginning an invasion of anarcho-communism in the states. Most was a passionate anarchist, who believed that the state should be ruled by a collective group of all citizens, without any form of government. (From : Black Flag of Anarchy Bio.)
• "Private property, guarded by the state, increasingly exploits the poor; and the poor less and less use what they produce. If the government did not wholeheartedly maintain this swindle, the masses would not suffer it." (From : "Anarchist Communism," by Johann Most, 1889.)
• "He who negates present society, and seeks social conditions based on the sharing of property, is a revolutionary whether he calls himself an anarchist or a communist." (From : "Anarchist Communism," by Johann Most, 1889.)
• "...the welfare of humanity, which the future can and will bring, lies in communism. It excludes in logical ways all authority and servitude, and therefore equals anarchy. The way to the goal is the social revolution. By energetic, relentless, international action, it will destroy class rule and establish a free society based on cooperative organization of production. Long Live the Social Revolution!" (From : "Anarchist Communism," by Johann Most, 1889.)
1837 — 1930
Mary G. Harris Jones (baptized 1837; died 1930), known as Mother Jones from 1897 onwards, was an Irish-born American schoolteacher and dressmaker who became a prominent union organizer, community organizer, and activist. She helped coordinate major strikes and co-founded the Industrial Workers of the World. (From: Wikipedia.org.)
Mreža anarhosindikalista i anarhosindikalistkinja (eng. The Network of Anarcho-syndicalists) or in short MASA (“masa” is also a Croatian word for mass, mob, crowd or similar – this is a note for you to understand the symbolic of our name.) is a propaganda organization from Croatia that tends to form an anarcho-syndicalist revolutionary syndicate confederation in Croatia, and to become a part of the IWA. As I said, the aim of our organization is to create an anarchist syndicate and to become a member of the IWA-AIT. We believe that this is the best way to form a strong anarchist movement in our country and to raise the class consciousness of the working class. We must be strong and united to be able to fight for our ... (From: Radical-Guide.com.)
Apr. 30, 1865 — Jul. 23, 1944
In well-informed circles, Max Nettlau was known as the 'Herodotus of Anarchy', the first and greatest historian of the anarchist movement. (From : IISW Bio.)
• "We Anarchists are internationalists, we acknowledge no distinction of nationality or color. The workers of all countries suffer as we do here, and our comrades have everywhere to fight the same battle for freedom and justice." (From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st,....)
• "Belief in and submission to authority is the root cause of all our misery." (From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st,....)
• "What does the State do? It protects the rich and their ill-gotten wealth; it suppresses the attempts of the workers to recover their rights, if these attempts are thought dangerous to the rich." (From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st,....)
Dec. 31, 1846 — Nov. 18, 1919
Ferdinand Jacobus Domela Nieuwenhuis (31 December 1846 – 18 November 1919) was a Dutch socialist politician and later a social anarchist and anti-militarist. He was a Lutheran preacher who, after he lost his faith, started a political fight for workers. He was a founder of the Dutch socialist movement and the first socialist in the Dutch parliament. (From: Wikipedia.org.)
Nov. 24, 1990 — ?
Keiji Nishitani (西谷 啓治, Nishitani Keiji, February 27, 1900 – November 24, 1990) was a Japanese philosopher of the Kyoto School and a disciple of Kitarō Nishida. In 1924 Nishitani received his doctorate from Kyoto Imperial University for his dissertation "Das Ideale und das Reale bei Schelling und Bergson". He studied under Martin Heidegger in Freiburg from 1937 to 1939. (From: Wikipedia.org.)
Anthony J. Nocella II, Ph.D., award-winning author and educator, is an Executive Director of the Institute for Critical Animal Studies, National Co-coordinator of Save the Kids, and co-founder and Editor of the Peace Studies Journal and Transformative Justice Journal. (From: anthonynocella.org.)
Translator of Leo Tolstoy.
Home|About|Contact|Search|Privacy Policy