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The Committee of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings has noted with much interest and satisfaction the letter of your correspondent in your impression of the 19th May, & has directed me to write to you, begging you, since the Society was mentioned in the letter, to insert a few words explanatory of its views on this point. The Committee are aware that the building needs repair badly enough; but it cannot help feeling that the plan of raising it bodily is fraught with danger to the fabric, however skillful may be the engineer who conducts the operation: the risk to the precious mosaics at any rate is undeniable, whatever may happen to the main structure of the walls, and these mosaics are in fact the very thing about the... (From: Marxists.org.)
Some three years ago the governors of Blundell's School at Tiverton, being pressed for want of room determined to sell the old school buildings and remove the school to another site: at that time our society in conjunction with some of the townsmen and neighbors of Tiverton, tried very hard to induce the governors not to desert the ancient home of their famous school, or at all events if they were driven to do so to find some public use for the beautiful buildings which were atthat time the most perfect example left us of a grammar school of the early seventeenth century: since all the fittings so carefully planned by the founder were still in their original places. Our protest was fruitless, and the buildings were sold to a private person... (From: Marxists.org.)
The two fearful massacres which have taken place this week are but a continuance of that fatal succession of mischances which has dogged the policy of the Government in Egypt. To blame the miserable administration in Cairo for what has taken place is simply to eke out incompetence with meanness. Of course the Khedive and his advisers were half-hearted in supporting Baker Pasha, of course they are ready to intrigue with D I Barrère or anybody else. That is the nature of Orientals; especially when straightforwardness as in the case of Arabi ended in the disgusting butchery of Tel-el-Kebir. But the main responsibility for all these horrors inflicted upon the luckless Egyptians must rest with England; and it is high time that our people ... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “The Boy-Farms at Fault” Commonweal, Vol 3, No. 81, 30 July 1887, p. 241; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. The silly season in the newspapers is beginning briskly with a rain of letters from distressed parents concerning their troubles in dealing with their male children home for the holidays. This is a kind of twaddle which is always recurring: this well-fed, well-housed bourgeois on the hunt for some artificial trouble or another, some sham grievance, since he has no real ones, except his own inherent stupidity and vacancy; but on this occasion there is, if the said bourgeois only knew it, a moral to be drawn. I can imagine the ‘boy’, ‘the enemy of the human race’, as Dickens called him, retort... (From: Marxists.org.)
The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings has heard with regret that it is the intention of the Dean & Chapter of Canterbury Cathedral, to remove from the Choir the ancient stalls which form such an interesting feature of the building. The Society feels it its duty to protest against such a course of action, which it considers injurious to the history, & art of the country. The Society begs to point out that this woodwork is remarkable for its intrinsic beauty, and although of comparatively late date, is a noble example of the art of its period, & in no way interferes with but rather adds to the Architectural Effect of the building. It is stated that these stalls conceal portions of more ancient work, part of the fitti... (From: Marxists.org.)
I am sorry to trouble you again in the matter of the proposed restoration of Canterbury Cathedral, but the Dean's letter shows that he has misunderstood both Mr Loftie and myself somewhat seriously, I think. He is mistaken in reading my letter as an approval of the schemes of restoration now afoot:on the contrary, I implied that the removal of the stalls now proposed would practically destroy a worthy work of art, which I value pretty much as Mr Loftie does, and I expressed a dread, which I still feel, that changes would not stop there, but would spread to the ancient fabric of the choir: I believe myself to be justified in that fear by the well-known fact that assurances of the kind the Dean is now giving are impossible to be kept to when ... (From: Marxists.org.)
As Mr Loftie's letter, quoted in your columns, calls on our Society by name, and as the letters of the Dean of Canterbury and Mr Beresford Hope touch our principles closely, I venture to hope that you will give me space for a word or two on the subject of the restoration of the choir of Canterbury Cathedral. As to the present woodwork at the west end, it seems superfluous to praise it, as it is agreed on all hands that it is good, though in some people's minds I suppose it would be condemned as inherently unholy, because it is a post-Reformation work. But, good as it is, I cannot conceive what purpose it can serve when it is taken away from the place it was made for, and in which it looks both dignified and serious, as well as elegant; furt... (From: Marxists.org.)
1. THE DAY IS COMING Come hither, lads, and hearken, for a tale there is to tell, Of the wonderful days a-coming, when all shall be better than well. And the tale shall be told of a country, a land in the midst of the sea, And folk shall call it England in the days that are going to be. There more than one in a thousand in the days that are yet to come Shall have some hope of the morrow, some joy of the ancient home. For then--laugh not, but listen to this strange tale of mine - All folk that are in England shall be better lodged than swine. Then a man shall work and bethink him, and rejoice in the deeds of his hand, Nor yet come home in the even too faint and weary to stand. Men in that time a-coming s... (From: Marxists.org.)
What is this, the sound and rumor? What is this that all men hear, Like the wind in hollow valleys when the storm is drawing near, Like the rolling on of ocean in the eventide of fear? 'Tis the people marching on. Whither go they, and whence come they? What are these of whom ye tell? In what country are they dwelling 'twixt the gates of heaven and hell? Are they mine or thine for money? Will they serve a master well? Still the rumor's marching on. Hark the rolling of the thunder! Lo the sun! and lo thereunder Riseth wrath, and hope, and wonder, And the host comes marching on. Forth they come from grief and torment; on they wend toward health and mirth, All the wide world is their dwelling, every cor... (From: Marxists.org.)
Many of your readers are aware that for some time a scheme has been on foot for rebuilding the north-western tower of Chichester Cathedral, which fell down about the year 1634, leaving only the lower portion standing, and that it is now proposed to carry out this work as a memorial to the late Bishop. The promoters of this scheme, in appealing to the public for funds, state that `unless this tower is rebuilt shortly the whole north-east corner of the Cathedral will come crashing to the ground, so bad is the state into which that part of the building has got owing to the lack of support which the tower was intended to supply.' This is an assertion eminently calculated to frighten those who remember the fall of the central spire in 1861 into... (From: Marxists.org.)
They rode in silence a good way, and it was some three hours after noon, and the day as fair and bright as might be. Christopher held his peace for sweet shame that he was alone with a most fair maid, and she his own, and without defense against him. But she amid of her silence turned, now red, and now somewhat pale, and now and again she looked somewhat askance on him, and he deemed her looks were no kinder than they should be. At last she spake, yet not looking on him, and said: "So, Forester, now is done what I must needs do: thy life is saved, and I am quit of Greenharbour, and its prison, and its torments: whither away then?" Quoth he, all dismayed, for her voice was the voice of anger: "I wot not whither, save to the house thou hast... (From: Marxists.org.)
The CHAIRMAN said he accepted the position in which he found himself because he felt it was only right that any one who had sympathy with the great movement of the present day should express that sympathy in a public manner. Perhaps there might be many who looked with suspicion upon a Christian minister occupying such a position. but he should like to say that it was because he was a Christian that he occupied the chair. The motto of Christianity, as it related to our social life, was gathered up in the words of the Apostle, "Bear ye one another's burdens." That, as he understood it, was also the motto of the socialistic movement. He did not think that the time had arrived when we could formulate schemes for the renovation of society; this ... (From: Marxists.org.)
The last of the present course of lectures under the auspices of the Socialist league was delivered on Tuesday evening, the Cooperative Hall, High street. The lecturer on this occasion was Mr. Wm. Morris, the editor of the official journal of the League and author of several works bearing on the subject of Socialism, who gave a vigorous address on "The Class Struggle.” Mr. Thos. Barclay presided, and there was a good attendance. The Lecturer said at the outset that Socialism in its modern form had not been before the English people for more than six or seven years, but that short time had changed its position very much. Before then it was assumed by ordinary politicians that in England there was no class grievance that could be put d... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “Coal in Kent” Commonweal, Vol 6, No. 217, 8 March 1890, p.77; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. The news that coal had been discovered in Kent, and that it would probably be found to be workable, has no doubt sent a shock of hope and expectation to some hearts and of terror to others. Among those who have anything to lose, those who are able to live in tolerably pleasant places without being too stupified by poverty to prevent their enjoying them, among the cultivated middle-classes in short, I should think the latter feeling prevails. The threat of the creation of a new black country on the ruins of the rural beauty of some of the most beautiful country in England, and close to London also, must impress most well-to-do... (From: Marxists.org.)
It will seem a mere commonplace to say, in your columns at any rate, that the crisis now drawing to an end is one of the most momentous in the history of the present labor war;1 yet it may well be doubted if the general public understand how momentous it is. To many it seems a mere troublesome interference of the overpaid, overfed miners with the ordinary and beneficent stream of production, which the coal-owners naturally and laudably resist, for the benefit, we must suppose, of all those who would like, if they could, to be as rich with as litle trouble as those worthies. To others it is an unavoidable nuisance, bound to recur at certain intervals, for which neither party is to blame, but which cannot be dealt with by the public at large ... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “Coercion for London” Commonweal, Vol 3, No. 70, 14 May 1887, p. 153-154; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. It may be thought that the patriots who are so eager for the unity of the British empire that they want to use artificial means to make it more specially uncomfortable to live in one part of it than it is elsewhere, are taking unnecessary trouble; that the coercionists are such enthusiasts in the art of coercion that they are hunting it when they have already got it. It is true that there is a pleasure in making a special and blatant demonstration of success, but it is a pleasure that has to be paid for by the opposition that the attempt to make it stirs up. The wise are contented with having the substance and let... (From: Marxists.org.)
Now first I suppose nobody, however rash he may be, can suppose that such a change can be brought about suddenly, or by the conscious efforts of a few or even a great many people. It is true that in times past there have been great men who have noted the woeful way in which the mass of people live, and who from the depths of their own insight and benevolence have imagined schemes for a better life, and in some of them enthusiasm and energy have been so strong that they have tried to realize those ideals, and for a time have seemed as if they might succeed; but the relentless march of the commercial army has crushed those schemes, and the ordinary shrewd bourgeois intelligence that can see no further than a limited part of its own time has c... (From: Marxists.org.)
... The privilege of birth has waned to such a poor shadow that an outcast tribe scarcely tolerated in Medieval Europe does now practically rule Europe; and one of these people in our country managed but a few years [ago] to persuade the extra-rich men who perhaps think (very mistakenly) that [they] are the lineal descendants of the baronage of our Plantagenet Kings, the he was marshaling them in triumph to the sure defense of their ancient position. The privilege of birth has gone, and the privilege of riches has taken its place. ... the long course of the centuries, therefore, whatever gain they have brought us otherwise, in development of man's intellect, or his power over material nature they have brought us no improvement in our socia... (From: Marxists.org.)
While I think that the hope of the new-birth of society is certainly growing, and that speedily, I must confess myself puzzled about the means toward that end which are mostly looked after now; and I am doubtful if some of the measures which are pressed, mostly, I think, with all honesty of purpose, and often with much ability, would, if gained, bring us any further on the direct road to a really new-born society, the only society which can be a new birth, a society of practical equality. Not to make any mystery about it, I mean that the great mass of what most non-Socialists at least consider at present to be Socialism, seems to me nothing more than a machinery of Socialism, which I think it probable that Socialism must use in its militant... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “Conscience of the Upper Classes” Commonweal, Vol 3, No. 101, 17 December 1887, p. 404; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford.. It seems to be universally admitted that the conference held on December 5th in the Memorial Hall, Farringdon Street, on the prevailing distress in London was the direct outcome of the unemployed agitation, for joining in which so many poor men have been sentenced with a spite at once so malignant and so petty that it fairly sickens an honest man to think of it. These rich and well-to-do persons were driven to meet together by a fear which I do not say they all felt in their own persons, but which is certainly permeating their class, a fear so easily aroused that a few hundred destitute, unarmed, pea... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “Correspondence” Commonweal, Vol 5, No. 175, 18 May 1889, p.157; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. In answer to our comrade Blackwell’s suggestion, and in default of someone else beginning that free discussion he speaks of, I wish to note down a few thoughts suggested by reading the clauses of the Anarchist Congress at Valentia, as stated by our comrade; premising that I do so in no polemical spirit, but simply giving my own thoughts and hopes for the future for what they may be worth. I will begin by saying that I call myself a Communist, and have no wish to qualify that word by joining any other to it. The aim of Communism seems to me to be the complete equality of condition for all people; and anything in a Soc... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “Christianity and Socialism” Commonweal, Vol 6, No. 217, 8 March 1890, p.77; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. Mr Rickarby’s letter, though written in a friendly and conciliatory spirit, requires, I think, some answer. Let it be admitted that Christianity, like all religions which include a system of morality, has something in common with socialism. Let it also be admitted that many of the ‘sneers and unjust charges’ of which Mr Rickarby writes, are aimed at the stupidities and hypocrisies of the Christianity of the day, which no doubt men of Mr Rickarby’s stamp sincerely condemn; granted this, yet if Christianity is ‘a revelation addressed to all times’ it can not be neutral as to pol... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “Correspondence: Communism and Anarchism” Commonweal, Vol 5, No. 188, 17 August 1889, p.261; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. I have to excuse myself for being so long in answering our comrades. My journey to the Paris Congress, and business necessary to be done before and after that event, accounts for the greater part of the delay. I will now do what I can to answer our friends who have written to the Commonweal. I must premise, by the way, that I have let a typographical error of importance pass unnoticed: for ‘moral conscience’ our friends should read ‘social conscience’. And now I find that one difficulty in dealing with the friends who are discussing the matter is that, in all probability,... (From: Marxists.org.)
The commission appointed by government to inquire into the sanitary condition of the weaving sheds where the delicious compound of filth called heavily sized cotton is worked up into cloth (?), says among other things: "The amount of size used to a given weight of cotton warp could no longer be actually described as being from 50 to 90 per cent.; 100, 120, 150 per cent. of size is now not unfrequently used. We conversed with one manufacturer, who admitted that to every 100 lb. of warp he put 200 lb. of size; another had gone as far as 230. In one factory visited by us the manufacturer weighed in our presence a piece of cotton cloth weighing 8 3/4 lb. and another weighing 4 1/2 lb. and remarked that the latter contained by far the larger amo... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “Counting Noses” Commonweal, Vol 4, No. 128, 23 June 1888, p.196; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. Mr Chamberlain ...believed that the experience of the United States and their own, so far as it had gone, went to show that when people were constantly being called on to vote, the whole matter fell into the hands of caucuses and machine politicians. Thus the reporters of the House of Commons give us the present view of the once semi-Socialist agitator, the advocate of the ransoming of the upper-classes; and no one can wonder at the ‘ironical cheers and laughter’ of the opposition that followed this expression of opinion from the once darling of the caucuses, the once supreme lender of the midland-county machi... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “'Common-Sense Socialism'” (review) Commonweal, Vol 3, No. 75, 18 June 1887, p. 197; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. The first word of the above title is usually a sort of danger signal to the wary reader to avoid boredom and confusion. ‘Common-sense’ as applied to knotty questions usually meaning the ignoring of the main issue, or the putting forward of a remedy difficult to apply and useless when applied. This is so well understood by persons with not more than the average amount of time for throwing away on futile and foolish literature, that the title of this book will probably prevent many people from looking into it at all. This is a pity, although before the end of the book the author justifies this ... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “The ‘Eight Hours’ and the Demonstration” Commonweal, Vol 6, No. 227, 17 May 1890, p.153; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. Now that the noise and clatter of the 4th of May demonstration are over, it may be profitable to consider what it was that that huge meeting was crying for, and whether it is likely to get it. But first we must assume that the 4th of May demonstration did not aim at showing any expression of sympathy with labor generally throughout the civilized world. It was in fact an English trades-union meeting distinct from the meetings held on the Continent and in London on May Day, although it was only the agitation on the Continent that made it possible. The English workmen, if we may believe th... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “'Looking Backward'” Commonweal, Vol 5, No. 180, 22 June 1889, p.194-195; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. We often hear it said that the signs of the spread of Socialism among English-speaking people are both abundant and striking. This is true; six or seven years ago the word Socialism was known in this country, but few even among the ‘educated’ classes knew more about its meaning than Mr Bradlaugh, Mr Gladstone, or Admiral Maxse know now — ie., nothing. Whereas at present it is fashionable for even West-end dinner-parties to affect an interest in and knowledge of it, which indicates a wide and deep public interest. This interest is more obvious in literature perhaps than in anything else, quite outs... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: “The Reward of ‘Genius'” Commonweal, Vol 2, No. 37, 25 September 1886, p.204-5-206; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. It is a very common incident at a debate on Socialism for an opponent or doubter to take up the cudgels on behalf of ‘brain-work’ as opposed to hand-work. Even before you avow yourself a Communist (as I have to do), such a questioner is anxious about the future of brain-work in the transitional stages of Socialism. Though this subject has been ably treated before in these columns, I will nevertheless venture on a few plain words in addition to what has been said; which I hesitate to do the less because I have had some small experience of hand-work, though not of the most laborious kind, ... (From: Marxists.org.)
Source: ‘The’ Law in Ireland” Commonweal, Vol 2, No. 50, 25 December 1886, p.305; Transcribed: by Ted Crawford. The Government has struck its stroke and we are to have another State trial on behalf of law and order. Unless a miracle of jury-packing is performed the accused will be acquitted, or at least the jury will not agree; so it is hard to see what the Government can gain unless they are prepared to go head over ears into coercion. Meantime not only are the Tory and other definitely reactionary papers jubilant at this exhibition of firmness, but all the Liberal Press approves with the single exception of the Pall Mall Gazette, to which must be added that Mr Labouchere at Birmingham spoke strongly and generously of... (From: Marxists.org.)

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