Browsing Revolt Library By Tag : piece of land

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IV AN hour after the boys were gone Eugene Mihailovich, the owner of the shop, came home, and began to count his receipts. Oh, you clumsy fool! Idiot that you are! he shouted, addressing his wife, after having seen the coupon and noticed the forgery. But I have often seen you, Eugene, accepting coupons in payment, and precisely twelve ruble ones, retorted his wife, very humiliated, grieved, and all but bursting into tears. I really dont know how they contrived to cheat me, she went on. They were pupils of the school, in uniform. One of them was quite a handsome boy, and looked so comme il faut. A comme il faut fool, that is what you are! The husband went on scolding her, while he counted the cash. . . . When I accept coupons, I see what is written on them. And you probably loo...

Anarchism and Crime Excerpted from the book; Individual Liberty Selections From the Writings of Benjamin R. Tucker Vanguard Press, New York, 1926 Kraus Reprint Co., Millwood, NY, 1973. Mr. B. W. Ball wrote an article in the Index criticizing Anarchism without having familiarized himself with the groundwork of that philosophy. Hence the following reply: Mr. Ball's central argument against us, stated briefly, is this: Where crime exists, force must exist to repress it. Who denies it? Certainly not Liberty; certainly not the Anarchists. Anarchism is not a revival of nonresistance, though there may be non-resistants in its ranks. The direction of Mr. Ball's attack implies that we would let robbery, rape, and murder make havoc in the community without lifting a finger to stay their brutal, bloody work. On the c...

An Inquiry into the Principle of Right and of GovernmentP. J. Proudhon: His Life and His Works. The correspondence of P. J. Proudhon, the first volumes of which we publish to-day, has been collected since his death by the faithful and intelligent labors of his daughter, aided by a few friends. It was incomplete when submitted to Sainte Beuve, but the portion with which the illustrious academician became acquainted was sufficient to allow him to estimate it as a whole with that soundness of judgment which characterized him as a literary critic. In an important work, which his habitual readers certainly have not forgotten, although death did not allow him to finish it, Sainte Beuve thus judges the correspondence of the great publicist: The letters of Proudhon, even outside the circle of his particular friends, will always be of value; we can always learn something from them, and here is the proper place to determine the general character of his correspondence.

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