Max Nettlau : German Anarchist, Historian, and Founder of the Anarchist Free Press

Revolt Library >> People >> Nettlau, Max

(1865 - 1944)

Description

In well-informed circles, Max Nettlau was known as the 'Herodotus of Anarchy', the first and greatest historian of the anarchist movement.

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From : IISW Bio

Quotes

"...in order to keep the rich in idleness and luxury, all the workers must lead a life of perpetual misery and exploitation."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

"What does the State do? It protects the rich and their ill-gotten wealth; it suppresses the attempts of the workers to recover their rights, if these attempts are thought dangerous to the rich."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

"There can be no true humanity, no true self-respect, without self-reliance. No one can help you if you do not help yourselves. We do not promise to do anything for you, we do not want anything from you, we only appeal to you to co-operate with us to bring about a state of society which will make freedom, well-being possible for all."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

"Belief in and submission to authority is the root cause of all our misery."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

"Economic exploitation - the result of the monopolization of the land, raw materials and means of production by the capitalists and landlords - is at the bottom of the present misery."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

"It is evident that this [Capitalist] system, if to be destroyed at all, must be attacked by the workers themselves, as we cannot expect those who profit by it to cut their own throats, so to say."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

"We Anarchists are internationalists, we acknowledge no distinction of nationality or color. The workers of all countries suffer as we do here, and our comrades have everywhere to fight the same battle for freedom and justice."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

"One fact is certain: all so-called religions are the products of human ignorance, mere phantastical efforts of barbarous people to reason out matters which they could not possibly understand without some knowledge of science and scientific methods."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

"Religion is the most deadly enemy to human progress. It has always been used to poison the mind and deaden the judgment of the young, thus making grown up people accept all its absurdities because they are familiarized with them in their youth."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

"Persecution is essential to authority and religion, and fatal to freedom; we should destroy the basis of our own hopes and ideals, if we were ever carried away by the spirit of persecution, bigotry and intolerance, which is so commonly raised against us."

From : "An Anarchist Manifesto," by Max Nettlau, May 1st, 1895

Biography


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About Max Nettlau

Max Heinrich Hermann Reinhardt Nettlau (German: [ˈnɛtlaʊ]; 30 April 1865 – 23 July 1944) was a German anarchist and historian. Although born in Neuwaldegg (today part of Vienna) and raised in Vienna, he lived there till the annexation to Nazi Germany in 1938. Max Nettlau retained his Prussian (later German) nationality throughout his life. A student of the Welsh language he spent time in London where he joined the Socialist League and met William Morris. While in London he met anarchists such as Errico Malatesta and Peter Kropotkin whom he remained in contact with for the rest of his life. He also helped to found Freedom Press for whom he wrote for many years.

In the 1890s realizing that a generation of socialist and anarchist militants from the mid-19th century was passing away and their archives of writings and correspondence being destroyed, he concentrated his effort and a recent modest inheritance from his father on acquiring and rescuing such collections from destruction. He also made many interviews of veteran militants for posterity. He wrote biographies of many famous anarchists, including Mikhail Bakunin, Élisée Reclus, and Errico Malatesta. He also wrote a seven volume history of anarchism.

His extensive collection or archives was sold to the International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam in 1935. He lived continuously in Amsterdam from 1938 where he worked on cataloging the archive for the Institute. "The Nazis, apparently, were not aware of this fact", so he died there suddenly from stomach cancer in 1944, without ever being harassed.

From : Wikipedia

Works

This person has authored 7 documents, with 69,044 words or 439,383 characters.

Anarchism : Anarchist and Anti-Authoritarianism -- 1895 ~ (6,178 Words / 37,282 Characters)
This pamphlet, written by Max Nettlau, appears in Anarchy Archives with the permission of IISH. An Anarchist Manifesto Issued By the London Anarchist Communist Alliance London: Printed and published at the Metropolitan Printing Works, 127, Ossulston Street, Euston Road, N.W. 1895. Price One Halfpenny       Fellow Workers,      We come before you as Anarchist Communists to explain our principles. We are aware that the minds of many of you have been poisoned by the lies which all parties have diligently spread about us. But surely the persecutions to which we have been and are subjected by the governing classes of all countries should open the eyes ... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

Anarchism : Anarchist and Anti-Authoritarianism -- 1907 ~ (4,544 Words / 28,226 Characters)
ARE THERE NEW FIELDS FOR ANARCHIST ACTIVITY? By Max Nettlau Published in Mother Earth on Nov. 5, 1907 in London by Int. Instituut Soc. Geschlodenis Amsterdam    I HAVE often wondered why, with millions of people taking part in progressive and labor movements of all kinds, comparatively few accept Anarchism fully as we do. What is better known than the exploitation of labor by capital, the oppression of the individual by the State, to the student the least interested in social matters and to the practical observer of everyday life? Again, if Anarchist propaganda has not yet touched every remote place in all countries, there are numerous localities where it has been carried on for a generation and more, and even there it ... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

Anarchism : Anarchist and Anti-Authoritarianism -- 1926 ~ (9,461 Words / 63,816 Characters)
MAX NETTLAU     A CONTRIBUTION TO AN ANARCHIST BIBLIOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA     EDITORIAL LA PROTESTA BUENOS AIRES   1926     MAX NETTLAU - A BIOGRAPHY             Max Nettlau was born in Neuwaldweg, near Vienna on 30 April 1865 and died on 23 July 1944. His father was descended form old Prussian stock, and had never renounced his nationality, although he lived in Austria. He saw to it that young Max received a very liberal education: after secondary schooling in Vienna, Max read philosophy in a variety of German towns. He secured his doctorate at the age of 23, with a thesis on Celtic languages.   ... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

Anarchism : Anarchist and Anti-Authoritarianism -- 1924 ~ (36,835 Words / 232,629 Characters)
Errico Malatesta The Biography of an Anarchist A Condensed Sketch of Malatesta from the book written by by Max Nettlau Published by the Jewish Anarchist Federation New York City. 1924 Introduction The short sketch of Malatesta's life is based on the exhaustive study of Max Nettlau, published in Italian translation by "Il Martello" in New York under the title Vita e Pensieri di Errico Malatesta, and in German translation issued at Berlin by the publishers of the "Syndicalist." Max Nettlau, the profound scholar of the Anarchist movement, biographer of Michael Bakunin and author of Bibliographie de l'Anarchie, lives in Vienna, and like so many intellectuals in Europe, in distressing economic conditi... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

Anarchism : Anarchist and Anti-Authoritarianism -- 1899 ~ (4,500 Words / 32,039 Characters)
GERMAN SOCIAL DEMOCRACY & E. BERNSTEIN.      Social Democrats in nearly all countries begin to reap what they have sown. For years the propoganda of principles has had to stand back before the reckless strife for votes to conquer political and municipal power, as the phrase goes. Their ranks were swelled on one side by masses of voters, whose real convictions and prejudices remained for the greater part untouched; on the other side, by politicians and selfseeking persons who were on the lookout for a party which would accept them as leaders. Among the inevitable consequences of these superficial flippant tactics are some apparent successes of a kind that makes sincere members of the party blush with shame--like... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

Anarchism : Anarchist and Anti-Authoritarianism -- 1909 ~ (2,901 Words / 17,469 Characters)
Nettlau, Max (1909). Panarchy, A Forgotten Idea of 1860. In Kurt Zube (Ed.), On the Topic No. 9. Germany: Mackay Gesellschaft PANARCHY. A Forgotten Idea of 1860 by Max Nettlau(1909)     For a long time I have been fascinated by the thought how wonderful it would be if at last, in public opinion on the succession of political and social institutions, the fateful term "one after another" would be replaced through the very simple and self-evident "simultaneously." "Down with the State!" and "Only upon the ruins of the State. . ." express emotions and wishes of many but it seems that only the cool "Opt out of the State" (No. 2 of "The Socialist") can help them towards their realization.    ... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

Anarchism : Anarchist and Anti-Authoritarianism -- 1899 ~ (4,625 Words / 27,922 Characters)
RESPONSIBILITY AND SOLIDARITY in the labor struggle: THEIR PRESENT LIMITS AND THEIR POSSIBLE EXTENSION.        (The substance of a paper read on December 5, 1899, before the Freedom Discussion Group, London by M. Nettlau.)        The following remarks, based on an article published by me in Freedom, November 1897, must not be understood as wishing to replace direct Anarchist propaganda by a "remedy or a "hobby," they simply raise a general subject which has been, as far as I know and am told, neglected up till now : the possibility of some new form and combination in the labor struggle; and I am anxious for Anarchist criticism, which, apart from the general possibility h... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

Chronology

April 30, 1865 :
Birth Day.

July 23, 1944 :
Death Day.

November 15, 2016 ; 5:29:43 PM (America/Los_Angeles) :
Added to http://www.RevoltLib.com.

March 13, 2018 ; 5:21:06 PM (America/Los_Angeles) :
Last Updated on http://www.RevoltLib.com.

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