Rosa Luxemburg

Revolt Library >> People >> Luxemburg, Rosa

Not Logged In: Login?

(1871 - 1919)

Biography


On : of 0 Words (Requires Chrome)

About Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg (German: [ˈʁoːza ˈlʊksəmbʊʁk] (About this soundlisten); Polish: Róża Luksemburg; also Rozalia Luksenburg; 5 March 1871 – 15 January 1919) was a Polish Marxist, philosopher, economist, anti-war activist and revolutionary socialist who became a naturalized German citizen at the age of 28. Successively, she was a member of the Social Democracy of the Kingdom of Poland and Lithuania (SDKPiL), the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), the Independent Social Democratic Party (USPD) and the Communist Party of Germany (KPD).

From : Wikipedia.org

Works

This person has authored 183 documents, with 622,934 words or 4,021,451 characters.

Source: Le Socialisme, March 15, 1908, on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of Marx’s death.Translated: from the French for marxists.org by Mitch Abidor. It is generally only after their death that the scientific value of most great thinkers is fully recognized. Time gives them their full importance. But there is a very particular reason why, as the day on which we lost the author retreats further into the past, Marxist theory increasingly penetrates social strata and finds new partizans. Marxist theory is nothing but the scientific reflex of the class struggle engendered by capitalism with the inevitability of a law of nature. The continuous extension and the growing strength of this theory are consequences of the law ... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Die Rote Fahne, November 27th, 1918.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker, pp.271-4.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. The charming little plan for a dignified, peaceable, ‘constitutional’ German revolution which preserves ‘law and order’, and which regards as its primary and most urgent task the protection of capitalist private property – this little plan is going to pot: Achero... (From : Marxists.org.)
Source: Le Socialisme, September 9, 1911.Translated: for marxists.org for Mitch Abidor. Dear Citizens: In a recent issue of Socialisme (no. 194, September 2) I read in the article by Citizen Compére-Morel, The Socialists and War, the following lines:   “To be sure, we don’t dispute that the majority, the overwhelming majority of the Mannheim Congress, lined up behind Bebel, refused to take into consideration a motion of Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht who, in Germany, carry on a campaign like that carried on in France by Hervé in favor of the theories exposed in 1893 by the Dutchman Domela Nieuwenhuis at the International Congress of Zurich, tending to create a special anti-militarist committee ... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: (in French) in Le Mouvement socialiste, 1 January 1903 (in response to a questionnaire).Source: The Social Democrat, August 1903.Transcription/Markup: Adam Buick/B. Baggins.Copyleft: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. Permission is granted to copy and/or distribute this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. I. The Church under the Monarchy and under the Republic When one speaks of an anti-clerical policy of Socialism, it is evident that it is not intended to attack religious convictions from a Socialistic point of view. The religion of the masses will only completely disappear with the society of today, when man, instead of being dominated by the social process, will dominate it ... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Die Rote Fahne, November 18th, 1918.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker, pp.253-7.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. The revolution has begun. What is called for now is not jubilation at was has been accomplished, not triumph over the beaten foe, but the strictest self-criticism and iron concentration of energy in order to continue the work we have begun. For our accomplishments are small and the foe has no... (From : Marxists.org.)
Originally published: in Polish in Czerwony Sztandar, No.86, June 1906. [1*]Translated: Peter Manson (from French). This translation from Weekly Worker, No.753, 22 January 2009. Copied with thanks from the CPGB/Weekly Worker Website.Marked up: Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive. Comrade Plekhanov has published an exhaustive article in the Courrier entitled, How far does the right go?, in which he accuses the Bolsheviks of Blanquism. It is not incumbent upon us to defend the Russian comrades upon whom comrade Plekhanov rains the blows of his erudition and dialectic. They are perfectly capable of doing so themselves. But it is worth commenting on certain remarks which our readers too will find of interest... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: Late November, 1918.First Published: Die Rote Fahne (The Red Flag), November 25, 1918.Translated: (from the German) by A. Lehrer.Transcription/Markup: A. Lehrer/Brian Baggins.Copyleft: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2002, 2003. Permission is granted to copy and/or distribute this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. PROLETARIANS! Men and Women of Labor! Comrades! The revolution in Germany has come! The masses of the soldiers who for years were driven to slaughter for the sake of capitalistic profits; the masses of workers, who for four years were exploited, crushed, and starved, have revolted. Prussian militarism, that fearful tool of oppression, that scourge of humanity – lies brok... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Leipziger Volkszeitung, July 24th, 1911.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. Because of the Morocco Affair, as is well known, it has occurred to a number of our French comrades that an international socialist demonstration against the militaristic colonial adventure is called for. This would be arranged by the organ competent for such matters, the International Socialist Bu... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: An illegal leaflet from May 1916. [1]Source: https://www.marxists.org/deutsch/archiv/luxemburg/1916/05/hundepol.htm.German original: Institute for Marxism-Leninism of the Central Committee of the SED, Central Party Archive, D.F. V/14.Translated from German: Schummelpilz, Amadanny.Redaction, Editing and Formatting: Luka, Schummelpilz.Markup: Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive. Editors’ Note: As the member of the Reichstag, Liebknecht had parliamentary immunity from prosecution. When the military judicial authorities demanded that this immunity be removed for organizing an anti-war demonstration on May the 1st (which was a huge success, with 10,000 attendants and clashes with the police), the ... (From : Marxists.org.)
Originally Written: April 30, 1913Source: The Communist, Vol. VII, No. 5, May 1928, pp. 262-264.Publisher: Workers (Communist) Party of AmericaTranscribed/HTML Markup: Brian ReidPublic Domain: Marxists Internet Archive (2009). You may freely copy, distribute, display and perform this work; as well as make derivative and commercial works. Please credit “Marxists Internet Archive” as your source. [The May Day article printed below was written by Rosa Luxemburg for May Day, 1913, a year before the outbreak of the World War. It shows the combination of sensitiveness to coming events and concern with the methods of meeting them which is characteristic of the highest kind of revolutionary leadership. Its scornful analysis of clas... (From : Marxists.org.)
From: Cahiers de la Quinzaine, no.11;Translated: for marxists.org by Mitch Abidor.   The socialist principle of class struggle demands the action of the proletariat wherever its interests as a class are in question. This is the case for all conflicts that divide the bourgeoisie. Every shift in the relation of social forces in bourgeois society, any change in the political relations of the country, influences, in the first place, the situation of the working class. We can’t act as indifferent witnesses to what goes on in the interior of the bourgeoisie, unless socialism could be realized outside of bourgeois society, for example through the foundation in each country of a separate colony. But since we haven’t thought o... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Die Rote Fahne, No.3, 18 November 1918.Source: International Socialist Review, Vol.30 No.1, January-February 1969, pp.5-6.Translated: (from the French which was from the original in German) William L. McPherson in Germany After the Armistice: A Report Based on the Personal Testimony of Representative Germany, Concerning the Conditions Existing in 1919, edited by Maurice Berger.Transcription/Markup: Einde O’Callaghan, Daniel Gaido, & Brian BagginsPublic Domain: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2005. This work is completely free. This is an alternate translation of the same work by a different name A Duty of Honor, which is the correct German translation for Eine Ehrenpflicht. We did not wish for amne... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Die Rote Fahne, November 18th, 1918.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker, pp.258-61.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. We did not want any ‘amnesty’, nor pardon, for the political prisoners who were the victims of the old order. We demanded our right to freedom, through struggle and revolution, for the hundreds of faithful and brave men and women who were languishing in prison because they had fo... (From : Marxists.org.)
(1902) First Published: Leipzeiger Volkszeitung, September 19, 1902. Source: German: Ausgewählte Reden und Schriften, II (Berlin: Dietz Verlag, 1951), pp.156-60; English: Selected Political Writings Rosa Luxemburg, 1971, edited by Dick Howard. Translated: (from the German) Rosemarie Waldrop. Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins. Copyright: Monthly Review Press © 1971. Printed with the permission of Monthly Review. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. An extensive debate concerning the eight-hour day followed the report on parliamentary activity at our Party Congress last Wednesday and Thursday. It is true, it ended with the usual referral of demands to our parliamentary delegation... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: April, 1916: Banned in Germany.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected political writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth. Revelation, III 15:16 Comrades! You are all aware of the division that exists in the bosom of the intra-party oppositio... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published:Source: New International, July 1942, pp.184-186.Translated: (from the German) E. LundTranscription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian BagginsCopyleft: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. Permission is granted to copy and/or distribute this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. The Reichstag elections of 1912 were viewed by the German liberal bourgeoisie as an important test of strength against the Kaiser and his landowner-militarist support. Though not able to control the executive branch of the government, the Reichstag had authority to legislate on questions of such first-rate importance to the bourgeoisie as the budget, taxes and tariffs. With the help of the Social Democracy, the bourg... (From : Marxists.org.)
German original: Protokoll der Verhandlungen des Parteitags der Sozialdemokratischen Partei Deutschlands, abgehalten zu Nürnberg vom 13. bis 19. September 1908, Berlin 1908, pp. 267–269.Source: Rosa Luxemburg, Gesammelte Werke, Vol. II, pp. 256–259.Translation: Rida Vaquas.Revision: Einde O’Callaghan.Transcription & Markup: Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive. At the Mannheim Congress, when the question of working together with the trade unions was unfurled in all its consequences and ways and means were sought, so that we would be able to achieve the inevitably necessary close cooperation in the interests of both branches of the workers’ movement, I was among those ... (From : Marxists.org.)
Introduction The first three letters were first presented by Feliks Tych in the Internationale wissenschaftliche Korrespondenz zur Geschichte der deutschen Arbeiterbewegung, 27. Jahrgang, September 1996, No.3. The fourth and fifth letters were published in the 6th volume of Rosa Luxemburg’s Letters in German, i.e. Rosa Luxemburg, Gesammelte Briefe, Vol.6, Dietz Verlag 1993. Detailed source information follows each letter. The first three letters were written at the same time as her article, The Russian Revolution, and can be understood as an extension of and commentary on it. The letters were written while Rosa Luxemburg was in prison in Breslau. The prison regime was such that she was able to her correspondence and articles smu... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: First published in Liepziger Volkszeitung, April 30, 1913.Published: From Selected Political Writings of Rosa Luxemburg, tr. Dick Howard (NY: Monthly Review Press, 1971).Online Version: marxists.org April 2002. In the middle of the wildest orgies of imperialism, the world holiday of the proletariat is repeating itself for the twenty-fourth time. What has taken place in the quarter of a century since the epoch-making decision to celebrate May Day is an immense part of the historical path. When the May demonstration made its debut, the vanguard of the International, the German working class, was breaking the chains of a shameful law of exception and setting out on the path of a free, legal development. The period of the long depre... (From : Marxists.org.)
(1903) [Exstract] First Published: (Polish) Przeglad Socialdemokratyczsy, January-February 1903. Source: (German) Politische Schriften, III (Frankfurt: Europaische, Verlagsanstalt, 1968), pp.23-82. (English) Selected Political Writings Rosa Luxemburg, 1971, edited by Dick Howard. Abstract: The original article contains parts 1-7. This work presents only 1-4. We earnestly hope to find someone who can translate the remaining sections of this work. Translated: Originally written in Polish, then translated into German (by Tadeusz Kachlak, with the help of Bernherd Blanke and Victoria Vierhelles), this text was translated from the German translation into English by Tom Herbst. Transcription/Markup: Ted Cr... (From : Marxists.org.)
Source: Le Socialiste, May 1-8, 1904;Translated: for marxists.org by Mitch Abidor. May Day this year stands out particularly because it is being celebrated in the midst of the noises of war. Because of this, its character as a demonstration in favor of world peace has the upper hand this year. But more than ever, in the presence of war, the specifically proletarian demonstration must also be the expression of this idea, that the realization of universal peace cannot be conceived of except as linked to the realization of our socialist final goal. If the Russo-Japanese War has demonstrated anything, it’s the vanity of the speculations of those “humanitarian” socialists who claim to found world peace on the system of eq... (From : Marxists.org.)
Originally written for a volume commemorating Ferdinantd Lassalle. [1*]This version: Weekly Worker, No.752, 15 January 2009.Translated: Ben Lewis. Copied with thanks from the CPGB/Weekly Worker Website.Marked up: Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive. Lassalle’s immediate relationship with the March [1848] revolution has remained a mere fragmentary, almost fleeting, one. This is partly because of his still relatively young age, but above all because of the peculiar concatenation of circumstances in his life which – for almost a decade – chained him to the individual fate of a woman badly abused by the dominant feudal powers and which have made his energy to the service of the revolution hi... (From : Marxists.org.)
First published: Die Gleichheit, No.18, 1913, pp.275-77.This translation: Weekly Worker, No.752, 15 January 2009.Translated: Ben Lewis. Copied with thanks from the CPGB/Weekly Worker Website.Marked up: Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive. “Hutten’s error was merely that of all prophetic natures: namely to view and desire at once a shining ideal, which humanity can only achieve step by step and bit by bit after centuries of struggle.” With these words, David Friedrich Strauss closes his novel Hutten. And what applies to Hutten also applies to Lassalle in the same degree. Of course, centuries do not come into consideration in the speedy development of contemporary capitalist development. B... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: July 1918 (in Breslau Prison).First Published: Vladimir Korolenko’s autobiographical novel A History of My Contemporary (pages 11-53). Berlin, 1919. Luxemburg had translated this work from the Russian into German, and wrote the following text as an introduction.Source: International Socialist Review, Vol.30 No.1, January-February 1969, pp.11-31.Translated: from the German by Frieda Mattick in New Essays: A Quarterly Devoted to the Study of Modern Society, Winter 1943.Transcription/Markup: Einde O’Callaghan, Daniel Gaido, & Brian BagginsPublic Domain: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2005. This work is completely free. I “My soul, of a threefold nationality, has at last found a home – and t... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: After the volanic eruption in May 1902 at the port of St. Pierre. First Published: Leipziger Volkszeitung, May 15, 1902. Translated: David Wolff, News & Letters, Jan.-Feb. 1983. Online Version: mea 1996; marxists.org 1999. Transcribed: Dave Hollis/Brian Baggins. Mountains of smoking ruins, heaps of mangled corpses, a steaming, smoking sea of fire wherever you turn, mud and ashes – that is all that remains of the flourishing little city which perched on the rocky slope of the volcano like a fluttering swallow. For some time the angry giant had been heard to rumble and rage against this human presumption, the blind self-conceit of the two-legged dwarfs. Great-hearted even in his wrath, a true giant, he warned... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: 1903First Published: Vorwärts (Berlin), No.64, 14 March 1903, Karl Marx.Translated: Christian FuchsTranscription/Markup: Joonas LaineCreative Commons: Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0. »The philosophers have only interpreted the world in various ways; the point is to change it». (Marx's 11th thesis on Feuerbach) Twenty years ago, Marx laid his towering head to rest. And although we only experienced a couple of years ago what in the language of German professors is called 'the crisis of Marxism', it suffices to throw a glance at the masses that today follow socialism alone in Germany and at socialism's importance in all so-called civilized countries, in order to grasp the immensity of the work of Marx's thoug... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: August 1911 in Leipzig.Source: Rosa Luxemburg, Gesammelte Werke, Vol.3.Publisher: Dietz, Berlin 1973, 4th edition.First Published: Leipziger Volkszeitung, No.199, 29th August 1911.Translated: Dave Hollis.Online Version: mea 1994; marxists.org 1999.Transcription: Dave Hollis/Brian Baggins. Introduction This is one of many articles that Rosa Luxemburg wrote on and around the question of the ‘Agadir incident’. This incident was sparked off by Germany’s attempt to spread her influence over the whole of Morocco. In view of the possibilities of a war breaking out on this issue, the French Socialists took this incident as grounds for wanting an international demonstration for Socialism. The French requested a ... (From : Marxists.org.)
(1899) [Extract] First Published: Leipziger Volkszeitung, February 20th-26th, 1899Abstract: Only Sections 1-3 are published. Sections 4-5 are omitted (please help us get this online!), containing Schippel’s analysis of militarism as a mechanism for releasing the economic pressures of capitalism.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected political writings, edited and introduced by Robert LookerTranslated: (from the German) W.D. GrafTranscription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian BagginsCopyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. I This is not the first time, and hopefully not the last, that critical voices concerning particular points in ... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Die Rote Fahne, November 20th, 1918.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker, pp.262-5.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. All the way from the Deutsche Tageszeitung, Die Vossische and Vorwärts to the independent Freiheit, from Reventlow, Erzberger and Scheidemann to Haase and Kautsky, comes a unanimous call for a national assembly. And at the same time there is a unanimous cry of fear at the idea of the pow... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Dortmunder Arbeiterzeitung, March 14th-15th, 1910.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. The question of the right to vote in Prussia, which has remained in a condition of immutability for more than half a century, is today the focus of Germany’s public life. A few weeks of energetic mass action by the proletariat have sufficed to stir up the old swamp of Prussian react... (From : Marxists.org.)
Published: The Class Struggle, Vol III. No. 4, August, 1919.Online Version: Sally Ryan for marxists.org August, 200.2Editorial Note: This article which appeared in the Red Flag of Berlin, the organ of the Spartacists of Germany, on the 18th of November, 1918, shows not only the fearless energy, but also the boundless goodness of heart of a great woman. Its contents may serve, moreover, as a fit weapon against the slanders with which unscrupulous opponents have tried to besmirch the memory of Rosa Luxemburg. For the political victims of the old regime of reaction we ask neither “amnesty” nor mercy. We demand the right of freedom, fight and revolution for those hundreds of true and faithful men and women who are languishing in ... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Spartacus, No.5, May 1917.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. The outbreak of the Russian Revolution has broken the stalemate in the historical situation created by the continuation of the world war and the simultaneous failure of the proletarian class struggle. For three years Europe has been like a musty room, almost suffocating those living in it. Now all at once a wind... (From : Marxists.org.)
German original: Protokoll der Verhandlungen des Parteitags der Sozialdemokratischen Partei Deutschlands, abgehalten zu Nürnberg vom 13. bis 19. September 1908, Berlin 1908, pp. 363–365.Source: Rosa Luxemburg, Gesammelte Werke, Vol. II, pp. 259–263.Markup: Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive. This speech was delivered by Rosa Luxemburg at the SPD’s Party Congress that took place in Nuremburg from 13 September to 19 September 1908. This congress took place in a context where the SPD parliamentarians in Baden had voted for their state budget, against the existing policy of SPD which was to always oppose state budgets. This controversy would later come to a head in 1910, when t... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: September 1898.Source: Sachsische Arbeiterzeitung, September 30, 1898.Transcription/Markup: Dario Romeo and Brian Baggins.Online Version: Rosa Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2000. Comrade Heine, as is well known, has written a pamphlet for the party conference entitled To Vote or Not to Vote? In it he comes out in favor of our participating in Prussian Landtag elections. It is not the main subject of his pamphlet that leads us to make a few necessary remarks, but rather the two terms which he mentions in his line of argument, and to which we react with particular sensitivity in consequence of the well-known events that have taken place recently in the party. The terms are: the art of the possible and opportunism. Hein... (From : Marxists.org.)
Spoken: September 14, 1908.Source: German: Ausgewählte Reden und Schriften, II (Berlin: Dietz Verlag, 1951), pp. 311–14; English: Selected Political Writings Rosa Luxemburg, 1971, edited by Dick Howard.Translated: (from the German) John Heckman.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins.Proofread: Einde OᰱCallaghan (May 2016).Copyright: Monthly Review Press © 1971. Printed with the permission of Monthly Review. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. If I take the floor, it is not to protest against the criticisms of the Party School, but on the contrary, to complain about the lark of a serious objective critique. The Party School is a new and very important institution, which must be seriously cr... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Leipziger Volkzeitung, May 6 and 8, 1911.Source: This work was reprinted in a shorter form in Die Internationale, January 1926. A translation of the latter piece was made in The Labor Monthly, July 1926, pp.421-428, from which this version is taken. We earnestly would like to print the full copy, instead of this abstract version, which is the best we’ve been able to find hitherto.Translated: (from the German) ?Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins.Copyleft: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. WHAT is our task in the question of peace? It does not consist merely in vigorously demonstrating at all times the love of peace of the Social Democrats; but first and foremost our task is to make clear ... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: The book to which this essay was the Foreword was published in Polish in Krakow in 1905. In addition to the Foreword, it contained several other articles by Rosa Luxemburg, and reprints of articles by Karl Kautsky, Franz Mehring, and “Parvus” (A. Helphand).Source: The National Question – Selected Writings by Rosa Luxemburg, edited and introduced by the late Horace B. Davis, Monthly Review Press, 1976.Translated: Original in Polish, translated to German, this version from the German to English. We realize this is not at all a desirable situation, and copyright free translations direct from the Polish would be highly prefered.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian BagginsPublic Domain: You can freely copy,... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: July 1896. This article appeared simultaneously in Sprawa Robotnicza, no.25, July 1896, and in the Italian publication, Critica Sociale, no.14, July 1896, where it was published in translation to Italian.Source: The National Question – Selected Writings by Rosa Luxemburg, edited and introduced by the late Horace B Davis, Monthly Review Press, 1976.Translated: Jurgen Hentze, Rosa Luxemburg: Iuternationalismus und Klassenkampf (Luchterhand: 1971), pp.142-52.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian BagginsProofed: by Matthew GrantPublic Domain: You can freely copy, distribute, display and perform this work; as well as make derivative and commercial works. Please credit the source above as well as the Marxists Internet Ar... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Spoken: July 22, 1913 to the Fourth Berlin constituency.First Published: Vorwärts, July 24, 1913.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. In Germany, the problem of the political mass strike was earlier discussed under the mighty pressure of the great Russian Revolution of 1905, a revolution in which the application of the mass strike brought both defeat and victory to the Russian pr... (From : Marxists.org.)
(6 July 1899) Originally published: Leipziger Volkszeitung, 6 July 1899.German Version: Rosa Luxemburg, Eine taktische Frage, Gesammelte Werke, Vol. 1.1, S. 483–486.French Version: Une question de tactique.Translation from French: Adam Buick.Markup: Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive. The entry of Millerand into the Waldeck-Rousseau cabinet merits study from the point of view of tactics and principles by foreign as well as French socialists. The active participation of socialists in a bourgeois government is, in any event, a phenomenon that goes beyond the framework of the usual activity of socialism. Is it a question of a form of activity that is as justified and opportune for the proleta... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: 1915.Source: Die Internationale, No. 1, 1915.Transcription/Markup: Dario Romeo and Brian Baggins.Online Version: Rosa Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2000. On August 4th, 1914, German Social Democracy abdicated politically, and at the same time the Socialist International collapsed. All attempts at denying or concealing this fact, regardless of the motives on which they are based, tend objectively to perpetuate, and to justify, the disastrous self-deception of the socialist parties, the inner malady of the movement, that led to the collapse, and in the long run to make the Socialist International a fiction, a hypocrisy. To collapse itself is without precedent in the history of all times. Socialism or Imperialism &nd... (From : Marxists.org.)
First translation of “Революционное похмелье”, Proletary, No. 44, 8 (21) April 1909, pp. 3–6. Article in Russian: https://www.mediafire.com/?o8uomwjvb70svbs. Translated by Noa Rodman. Copied with thanks from the Libcom.org Website. Marked up by Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive. Lenin wrote in a letter to Luxemburg: ‘Your article against the otzovists and ultimatumists has pleased everyone very much.’ At the conference of the extended editorial board of Proletary, Zinoviev mentioned her article: ‘And in fact the performance of the otzovist... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: January/February 1905.First Published: February 8, 1905Source: Zeitschrift fòr die Interessen der Arbeiterinnen, no.3, February 8th, 1905.Transcription/Markup: Dario Romeo and Brian Baggins.Online Version: Rosa Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2000. On January 22nd in Petersburg [January 9th according to the Russian used Julian calender], the first mass revolutionary rising of the Russian proletariat against absolutism was put down ‘victoriously’ by the terrorist government, that is, it was drowned in the blood of thousands of defenseless workers, in the blood of the murdered men, women and children of the people [Bloody Sunday]. It is possible that – at least in Petersburg itself – a lull... (From : Marxists.org.)
Spoken: December 1906.First Published: Leipziger Volkszeitung of 13 December 1906.Source: Socialist Standard of January 1907 (abridged).Transcription/Markup: Adam Buick/B. Baggins.Copyleft: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2003. Permission is granted to copy and/or distribute this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. On the twelfth of last month Rosa Luxemburg was tried at the Criminal Court at Weimar for “inciting to the use of physical force” by the speech she contributed to the discussion on the General Strike at the annual Congress of the German Socialist Party held in 1905 at Jena. The court was densely crowded. Besides a great number of Socialists the audience included a good many ... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: September 1918.Source: Spartacus, No. 11, 1918.Transcription/Markup: Dario Romeo and Brian Baggins.Online Version: Rosa Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2000. Since the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, the Russian Revolution has entered into a very difficult phase. The policy which has guided the Bolsheviks’ action is obvious: peace at any price in order to gain a respite, during which they can expand and consolidate the dictatorship of the proletariat in Russia, and realize as many socialist reforms as possible. They plan in this way to await the outbreak of the international proletariat revolution and at the same time to expedite it by the Russian example. Since the utter war-weariness of the Russian masses and the... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: June 1904.Source: Sächsische Arbeiterzeitung, June 5-6, 1904.Transcription/Markup: Dario Romeo and Brian Baggins.Online Version: Rosa Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2000. Once again the Reichstag has convened under very characteristic circumstances. On the one hand there are renewed and brazed attacks by the reactionary press – of the caliber of the Post – against the universal franchise, and on the other, clear signs of a ‘parliamentary weariness’ in the bourgeois circles themselves; together with this, there is the government’s evident intention to defer the convocation of the Reichstag until shortly before the Christmas holiday – all this presents a crass picture of a rapid ... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: October 8, 9, 10, 1896 in the Sächsische Arbeiter-Zeitung, the German Social Democratic paper in Dresden.Source: The Balkan Socialist Tradition in Revolutionary History, Vol.8 no.3, 2003.Translated: (from the German) by Ian Birchall.Transcription/Markup: Edward Crawford/Brian Baggins.Proofed: by Matthew Grant.Copyleft: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. Permission is granted to copy and/or distribute this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. I: The Turkish Situation IN the party press, we all too often encounter the attempt to represent the events in Turkey as a pure product of the play of diplomatic intrigue, especially on the Russian side.[A] For a time, you could even co... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: 1905.First Published: by the Polish Social Democratic Party in 1905.Source: A Russian edition appeared in Moscow in 1920. A French edition was issued by the French Socialist Party in 1937. First English Edition published by Socialist Review, Birmingham. The text here is reproduced from the 1979 Colombo edition. Copyright free status is verified by a 1972 publication of the same translation, by Merlin Press, without Copyright notice.Translated: from the French by Juan Punto.Transcription/Markup: Youth for International Socialism/Brian Baggins.Copyleft: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2003. Permission is granted to copy and/or distribute this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. Part One Fro... (From : Marxists.org.)
Spoken: October 3 & 4, 1898Source: Selected Political Writings Rosa Luxemburg, 1971, edited by Dick Howard, text from the German Ausgewählte Reden und Schriften, II (Berlin: Dietz Verlag, 1951), 28-33.Translated: (from the German) John Heckman.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins.Copyright: Monthly Review Press © 1971. Printed with the permission of Monthly Review Press. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. This is the text of two speeches made to the Stuttgart Congress of the German Social Democratic Party in 1898, in the discussion on tactics. Speech of October 3, 1898 The speeches of Heine and others have shown that an extremely important point has been obscured in our Party, namely that of u... (From : Marxists.org.)
Spoken: October 11, 1899Source: German: Ausgewählte Reden und Schriften, II (Berlin: Dietz Verlag, 1951), pp.78-86; English: Selected Political Writings Rosa Luxemburg, 1971, edited by Dick Howard.Translated: (from the German) John HeckmanTranscription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian BagginsProofed: by Matthew GrantCopyright: Monthly Review Press © 1971. Printed with the permission of Monthly Review. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. Comrades, it would be like carrying water to the sea if I were to address myself to the theoretical side of the problem after Comrade Bebel’s excellent presentation. Bebel handled these questions so thoroughly and brought so many new facts to bear against Bernstein that it would be s... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: 1903.Source: Karl Marx: Man, Thinker and Revolutionist, edited by D. Ryazanov.Publisher: International Publishers, New York, 1927.Translated from German: Eden and Cedar Paul.Republished: New International, Vol. VI No. 7 (Whole No. 47), August 1940. pp. 143–144.Transcription/Markup: Dario Romeo and Brian Baggins.Proofread: Einde O’Callaghan (July 2013).Online Version: Rosa Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2000. In his shallow but at time interesting causerie entitled Die soziale Bewegung in Frankreich und Belgien (The Socialist Movement in France and Belgium), Karl Grün remarks, aptly enough, that Fourier’s and Saint-Simon’s theories had very different effects upon their r... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: Late 1915.Source: Fourth International (Amsterdam), No. 8, Winter 1959/60, pp. 20–21.Transcription/Markup: Einde O’Callaghan for the Marxists’ Internet Archive.Online Version: Rosa Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2000. A large number of comrades from different parts of Germany [1] have adopted the following theses, which constitute an application of the Erfurt program to the contemporary problems of international socialism. 1. The world war has annihilated the work of 40 years of European socialism: by destroying the revolutionary proletariat as a political force; by destroying the moral prestige of socialism; by scattering the workers’ International; by setting its Sections one against ... (From : Marxists.org.)
Source: Le Socialiste, May 5-12, 1901;Translated: for marxists.org by Mitch Abidor. Dear Comrades: May First is, above all, a review of the international forces of socialism, of their progress, of their forms. How different is the situation of the workers’ battalions today from what it was twelve years ago at the time of the celebration of this day! But what about the internal crisis that we are going through more or less everywhere? What about the doubts, the skepticism, the deviations in our ranks? Well, these too are nothing but a symptom of our growth. In the last ten years, on the heels of the definitive collapse of bourgeois democracy, new layers of society have little by little passed over to us in their entirety, m... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: September 28, 1911.First Published/Source: Justice, 7th October 1911, p.7. Justice was the journal of the British Marxist group, the Social Democratic Federation, later the BSP.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyleft: Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. September 28, 1911 To the Unity Conference of the Socialist Organizations in Manchester Dear Comrades, – It is with very great pleasure that we have received the intimation of your Unity Conference, and send you our best wishes for the success of your deliberations. In common with the organized Socialist Proletariat of the World, we also regard the unification of the real Sociali... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Die Neue Zeit, October 24, 1907 (vol.1, no.4).Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert LookerTranslated: (from the German) W.D. GrafTranscription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House © 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. The new wage agreement of the printers’ union outwardly appears not to be connected in any way with the deliberations of the Mannheim Party Conference, but following upon its heels it can be seen as a drastic commentary on it. The printers’ trade union has long been regarded i... (From : Marxists.org.)
Written: 1894. First published in Polish in Sprawa Robotnicza.Published: From Selected Political Writings of Rosa Luxemburg, tr. Dick Howard, Monthly Review Press, 1971, pp. 315-16.Online Version: marxists.org April, 2002.Transcribed: http://www.ultrared.org/lm_mayday.html.Proofed: by Matthew Grant. The happy idea of using a proletarian holiday celebration as a means to attain the eight-hour day was first born in Australia. The workers there decided in 1856 to organize a day of complete stoppage together with meetings and entertainment as a demonstration in favor of the eight-hour day. The day of this celebration was to be April 21. At first, the Australian workers intended this only for the year 1856. But this first celebration had such... (From : Marxists.org.)
First Published: Die Gleichheit, February 5th, 1912.Source: Rosa Luxemburg: Selected Political Writings, edited and introduced by Robert Looker.Translated: (from the German) W.D. Graf.Transcription/Markup: Ted Crawford/Brian Baggins with special thanks to Robert Looker for help with permissions.Copyright: Random House, 1972, ISBN/ISSN: 0224005960. Printed with the permission of Random House. Luxemburg Internet Archive (marxists.org) 2004. I: THE NEW SITUATION For almost two years the activities of the Social-Democratic Party were geared mainly to the Reichstag elections. The great event is now behind us, and we can review the overall situation. Have the Reichstag elections created a completely new situation which holds new political p... (From : Marxists.org.)
Speech: May 12, 1912 (at the Second Social Democratic Women’s Rally, Stuttgart, Germany).Source: Selected Political Writings, Rosa Luxemburg. Edited and introduced by Dick Howard. Monthly Review Press © 1971.Translated: Rosmarie Waldrop (from the German Ausgewählte Reden und Schriften, 2 (Berlin: Dietz Verlag, 1951, pp.433-41).Transcription/Markup: Brian Baggins.Copyright: Monthly Review Press © 1971. Published here by the Marxists Internet Archive (marxists.org, 2003) with permission from Monthly Review Press. “Why are there no organizations for working women in Germany? Why do we hear so little about the working women’s movement?” With these questions, Emma Ihrer, one of the founders of the prolet... (From : Marxists.org.)

Chronology

March 05, 1871 :
Birth Day.

January 15, 1919 :
Death Day.

March 05, 2021 ; 4:54:06 PM (America/Los_Angeles) :
Added to http://www.RevoltLib.com.

March 05, 2021 ; 5:00:56 PM (America/Los_Angeles) :
Last Updated on http://www.RevoltLib.com.

Share

Permalink for Sharing :
Share :

Comments

0 Likes
0 Dislikes

No comments so far. You can be the first!

Navigation

<< Last Entry in People
Current Entry in People
Rosa Luxemburg
Next Entry in People >>
All Nearby Items in People