Browsing People : Persons and Individuals Involved with the Revolution

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(? - 1935)
Nathan Haskell Dole (August 31, 1852 – May 9, 1935) was an American editor, translator, and author. He attended Phillips Academy, Andover, and graduated from Harvard University in 1874. He was a writer and journalist in Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. He translated many works of Leo Tolstoy, and books of other Russians; novels of the Spaniard Armando Palacio Valdés (1886–90); a variety of works from the French and Italian. Nathan Haskell Dole was born August 31, 1852, in Chelsea, Massachusetts. He was the second son of his father Reverend Nathan Dole (1811–1855) and mother Caroline (Fletcher) Dole. Dole grew up in the Fletcher homestead, a strict Puritan home, in Norridgewock, Maine, where his grandmother lived and where his mother moved with her two boys after his father died of tuberculosis. Sophie May wrote her Prudy Books in Norridgewock, which probably showed the sort of life Nathan and his older brother Charles Fletcher Dol... (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1902 - 1990) ~ Russian Emigre and American Anarchist Activist : He rode the rails for the Wobblies, sometimes as a gandy dancer (or maintenance man), or else hopping boxcars, and he always looked for the chance to stand in front of a crowd and, in that broken cello of a voice. (From : IWW.org.)
• "Society without order (as the word 'society' implies) is inconceivable. But the organization of order is not the exclusive monopoly of the State. For, if the State authority is the sole guarantee of order, who will watch the watchmen?" (From : "The Relevance of Anarchy to Modern Society," by S....)
• "The increasing complexity of society is making anarchism MORE and NOT LESS relevant to modern life. It is precisely this complexity and diversity, above all their overriding concern for freedom and human values that led the anarchist thinkers to base their ideas on the principles of diffusion of power, self-management and federalism." (From : "The Relevance of Anarchy to Modern Society," by S....)
• "The very fact that autonomy, decentralization and federalism are more practical alternatives to centralism and statism already presupposes that these vast organizational networks now performing the functions of society are prepared to replace the old bankrupt hyper-centralized administrations." (From : "The Relevance of Anarchy to Modern Society," by S....)

(1825 - 1918)
Victor S. Drury (1825–1918) was a labor leader and political radical. (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1939 - 1992)
A short biography of Australian anarchist poet, James Herriott Duke, who also lived in the UK. Remembering Jim Duke "I started performing poems as a timid person with a stutter but the spirit of the times soon converted me into a bellowing bull." Jim Duke “The voice played like a human saxophone.” Nicholas Zurbrugg I first met Jim Duke in the basement flat of the artist John Upton in the narrow canyon of St Michael’s Place, the bohemian slum street that stood in for Greenwich Village or Haight Ashbury in Brighton in the late 60s. Jim was as bald as a billiard ball as a result of some affliction that had robbed him of his head hair. He was then clean shaven, although on his return to Australia in the early 70s he began to cultivate a luxurious beard that w... (From : LibCom.org.)


Alexander Dunlap holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands. His PhD thesis examined the socio-ecological impact of wind energy development on Indigenous people in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec region of Oaxaca, Mexico. Alexander's work has critically examined police-military transformations, market-based conservation, wind energy development and extractive projects more generally with coal mining in Germany and copper mining in Peru. Current research investigates the formation of transnational-super grids and the connections between conventional and renewable extraction industries. (From : sum.uio.no.)

(1878 - 1945)
Amédée Dunois (16 December 1878 – March 1945) was a French lawyer, journalist and politician. Amédée Catonné was born in Moulins-Engilbert, Nièvre on 16 December 1878. He came from a respectable family. He was a brilliant student, already displaying literary gifts and cultural tastes that would distinguish him as a humanist. He earned a doctorate in law in 1899. He adopted the name Amédée Dunois, and worked as a journalist for Temps nouveaux (1906–07) and La Bataille syndicaliste (1908–12). From 24–31 August 1907 he attended the International Anarchist Congress of Amsterdam with Pierre Monatte, Benoît Broutchoux, Erné de Marmande, Henri Beylie and others. In 1908 he joined the Anarchist Federation of the Seine and Seine-et-Oise. Amédée Dunois worked with Jean Jaurès as political editor of L'Humanité from 1911, and became general secretary of the... (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1896 - 1936) ~ Heart of the Anarchist Soldiers and Anarcho-Syndicalism During the Spanish Civil War : On the 15 Durruti arrived with a force of 1800 men to reinforce the defense of Madrid, where they went immediately to the toughest section and on the 19 he was struck by a bullet as he walked by a supposedly secure area. (From : Communiello Bio.)
• "The emancipation of the working class requires the complete destruction of capitalism and we can't stop our revolutionary efforts until that happens." (From : "Durruti," by Abel Paz, part 1, chapter 1.)
• "You have to lead the struggle yourselves, without bosses or leaders." (From : "Durruti," by Abel Paz, part 1, chapter 11.)
• "We have the right and obligation to force the negative to clash with the positive and cause the spark. Is that adventurism? Then I say that all revolutions have been triggered by adventurists." (From : "Durruti," by Abel Paz, part 1, chapter 10.)

(1850 - 1935)
Clément Duval (French pronunciation: ​[klemɑ̃ dyval]; 1850 – 1935) was a famous French anarchist and criminal. His ideas concerning individual reclamation were greatly influential in later shaping illegalism. According to Paul Albert, "The story of Clement Duval was lifted and, shorn of all politics, turned into the bestseller Papillon."... (From : Wikipedia.org.)

(1944 - )
Abdul Kader El-Janabi , born on July 1 , 1944 in Baghdad , is an Iraqi poet , journalist , writer and translator , libertarian . In his youth, several members of his family sympathize with the Iraqi Communist Party and it is influenced by surrealism . But in the 1960s, he was forced into exile following the establishment of a Baath party police regime encouraged by the United States . Exiled to Great Britain , he joined the Trotskyist movement, the International Marxist Group , led by Tariq Ali . He then left for France where he has lived since 1972 . He mounted various magazines including Le Désir Libertaire ('Ar Raghba El-Ibâhiyya'). He published texts by Muslim libertines from the time of the Abbasid caliphate in Baghdad as well as texts by Georges Henein , the forerunner of surrealism in Egypt . Refusing any sacred union in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict , he binds himself with Israeli writers and calls for a just solu... (From : Wikipedia.org.)


When we protest against those who govern the world, we cannot use measured means. The system wants someone (or some people) to govern everyone, and the individual can do nothing. And in these days thousands of individuals, not only some anarchists (now that everything interests us except riding the tiger), have expressed and have lived their own anger without mediations. (From : El Paso.)

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