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The Resurrection

CHAPTER IV.

Having breakfasted, Nekhludoff went to the cabinet to see for what hour he was summoned to appear at court, and to answer the Princess' note. In the work-room stood an easel with a half-finished painting turned face downward, and on the wall hung studies in drawing. On seeing that painting, on which he had worked two years, and those drawings, he called to mind the feeling of impotence, which he experienced of late with greatest force, to make further advance in the art. He explained this feeling by the development of a fine esthetic taste, and yet this consciousness caused him unpleasant sensations.

Seven years before he had retired from active service he decided that his true vocation in life was painting, and from the height of his artistic activity he looked down upon all other occupations. And now it appeared that he had no right to do so, and every recollection of it was disagreeable to him. He looked on all the luxuri...


The Baby by Octave Mirbeau (1848-1917) Translated from the French by Robert Helms "L'Enfant" originally appeared in the Paris periodical La France on October 21, 1885. Motteau gave his testimony as follows: "There you have it, your honor. You've listened to all these people --my good neighbors and my good friends. They haven't cut me any slack, and that's fair enough. Th (From : Mid-Atlantic Infoshop.)

The text is from my copy of Alexander Berkman, The Bolshevik Myth, New York: Boni and Liveright, 1925. Page numbers are in the source code.

THE BOLSHEVIK MYTH

CHAPTER I

THE LOG OF THE TRANSPORT "BUFORD"

ON BOARD THE U.S.T. "BUFORD."

      December 23, 1919.- We are somewhere near the Azores, already three days at sea. No one seems to know whither we are bound. The captain claims he is sailing under sealed orders. The men are nearly crazy with the uncertainty and worry over the women and children left behind. What if we are to be landed on Denikin territory.

.      .      .      .      .      .     

      We were kidnapped, literally kidnapped out of be...


From: International Publishers, International Pamphlets No. 12, sponsored by the John Reed Club, an organization of revolutionary writers and artists in New York. Third edition, 1934. THE LESSONS OF THE PARIS COMMUNE BY ALEXANDER TRACUTENBERG On March 18, 1871, the revolutionary workers of Paris established the Commune. It was the first attempt at a proletarian dictatorship. Again and again the story has been told: how Napoleon III (the Little) attempted to bolster up the decaying regime of the Second Empire by declaring war on Prussia in July, 1871; how he met his debacle at Sedan and exposed Paris to the Prussian troops; how a bourgeois republic was proclaimed in September and a so-called Government of National Defense organize... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

4

THE ATTENTAT

THE DOORS OF Frick's private office, to the left of the reception-room, swings open as the colored attendant emerges, and I catch a flitting glimpse of a black-bearded, well-knit figure at a table in the back of the room.
      "Mistah Frick is engaged. He can't see you now, sah," the negro says, handing back my card.
      I take the pasteboard, return it to my case, and walk slowly out of the reception-room. But quickly retracing my steps, I pass through the gate separating the clerks from the visitors, and brushing the astounded attendant aside, I step into the office on the left, and find myself facing Frick.
      For an instant the sunlight, streaming through the windows, dazzles me. I discern two men at the further end of the long table.
      "Fr-," I begin. The look of terror on his face strikes me speechless. It is the dread of the conscious presence of death. "He understands," ...


The Spirit of Revolt, 1880 Peter Kropotkin (1842-1921) There are periods in the life of human society when revolution becomes an imperative necessity, when it proclaims itself as inevitable. New ideas germinate everywhere, seeking to force their way into the light, to find an application in life; everywhere they are opposed by the inertia of those whose interest it is to maintain the old order; they suffocate in the stifling atmosphere of prejudice and traditions. The accepted ideas of the constitution of the State, of the laws of social equilibrium, of the political and economic interrelations of citizens, can hold out no longer against the implacable criticism which is daily undermining them whenever occasion arises,--in drawing room... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

    Foreword

  Part I. Kronstadt (1921)

    Chapter 1. Geographical Notes

    Chapter 2. Kronstadt Before the Revolution

    Chapter 3. Kronstadt as the Vanguard of the Revolution

    Chapter 4. Kronstadt Turns Against the Bolshevik Imposture

    Chapter 5. Last Act: The End of Independence

  Part II. Ukraine (1918–1921)

    Chapter 1. Mass Movement in the Ukraine

    Chapter 2. Formation of the Makhnovist Insurrectionary Army

    Chapter 3. Denikin’s Offensives and Final Defeat

    Chapter 4. The Makhnovists in the Liberated Regions

    Chapter 5. W...


THE WOMEN OF THE COMMUNE      WE have all been so drilled from our youth up in the prejudices of property and authority that even the workers, for whom property and authority have done so little, are not free from superstitious belief in their necessity. Especially we are all too much inclined to believe that mere confusion must follow on a popular revolt, unless some central or local authority be immediately set up to control social life and reorganize the people.      During the Commune of 1871, the newly-elected Municipal Government was too deeply engaged by the enemy at the gates to make many attempts at social reconstruction. Was the city, in which so much of the old order had been overth... (From : AnarchyArchives.)

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