Browsing Anarchism : Anarchist and Anti-Authoritarianism

Revolt Library >> Anarchism >> Browsing

Not Logged In: Login?

This archive contains 4,579 documents, with 24,243,002 words or 150,074,088 characters.

Browsing : 201 to 210 of 1801

Results Per Page :

by Johann Most, 1884
From: [Freiheit, September 13, 1884] Since we believe that the propaganda of action is of use, we must be prepared to accept whatever attendant circumstances it involves. Everyone now knows, from experience, that the more highly placed the one shot or blown up, and the more perfectly executed the attempt, the greater the propagandistic effect. The basic preconditions of success are methodical preparation, deception of the enemy in question and the overcoming of any obstacles that stand between the one who is to carry out the deed and the enemy. The expense incurred by such undertakings is, as a rule, quite considerable. Indeed, one could go so far as to say that the possibility of such an action succeeding usually depends on whether the financial means are available to overcome the difficulties. Nowadays, money opens a number of doors one could not break open with an iron bar. The persuasive clinking of coins turns me... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

by Federica Montseny, 1928
Preface: Max Nettlau, or The Choice of Modesty – Federica Montseny Blessed are those whose souls are transparent, whose lives are honest, and whose hearts are pure; for theirs is the kingdom of the earth. Blessed are those who believe in human goodness, those who preserve their illusions intact and nourish the hope that for them the doors of life will open. Blessed are those who offer the world their fraternal right hand and friendly visage, those who go with a smile on their lips and cast a light before them. And blessed, too, are those who can love those who can believe, those who can discover within the human wasteland, a tree under which their anxieties concerning their ideal, and their human desires for trust and affection, can take shelter. Without goals to aim for and without any figures on the horizon in whom we can crystallize our life and our need for encouragement and for example, what... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

by Émile Pouget, 1898
Wherever authority shows its ugly mug it causes problems. The family is no exception to this rule. How many parents, for wanting to throw around their weight, have their kid’s deaths on their conscience? The old figure that because they’re withered, because they’ve racked up what is called “experience,” that they’re full of wisdom and can treat their offspring – who are approaching twenty – like they were still sucking on a bottle. Course, in the projects of the old the biggest place is given over to the matter of dough – as for love that they just neglect. But for young people it’s exactly the opposite that matters. No need to say that they’re the ones that are right! As soon as they learn in the house that the girl or boy is spending time with someone who is screwing up their carefully laid plans, a life from hell begins; Mommy brays, makes a scene, daddy st... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

by Raffaele Schiavina, 1980
I was born in San Carlo in the province of Ferrara on 8 April 1894 into a peasant family. When I finished school in 1912 I had the chance to satisfy my desire to go to America the following year and settled in Brockton, Massachusetts. In those days I regarded myself as a socialist, not really out of reasoned conviction but simply lest I give the impression that I was a conservative. During summer 1914, at an Italian-American picnic, I made the acquaintance of a man considerably older than me who told me that he was an anarchist and offered me, to read, a book that he said that he had enjoyed reading. In fact it was Kropotkin’s Memoirs which held my attention, for I discovered in it feelings and ideas that it seemed had always been a part of me. I went on reading what he lent me and took out a subscription to Cronaca Sovversiva which, in a very short space of time, had become essential reading for me. The war in Europe was just beginning at th... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

by Raffaele Schiavina
I was born in San Carlo in the province of Ferrara on 8 April 1894 into a peasant family. When I finished school in 1912 I had the chance to satisfy my desire to go to America the following year and settled in Brockton, Massachusetts. In those days I regarded myself as a socialist, not really out of reasoned conviction but simply lest I give the impression that I was a conservative. During summer 1914, at an Italian-American picnic, I made the acquaintance of a man considerably older than me who told me that he was an anarchist and offered me, to read, a book that he said that he had enjoyed reading. In fact it was Kropotkin’s Memoirs which held my attention, for I discovered in it feelings and ideas that it seemed had always been a part of me. I went on reading what he lent me and took out a subscription to Cronaca Sovversiva which, in a very short space of time, had become essential reading for me. The war in Europe was just beginning at th... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

by Mother Jones, 1925
Chapter I – Early Years I was born in the city of Cork, Ireland, in 1830. My people were poor. For generations they had fought for Ireland’s freedom. Many of my folks have died in that struggle. My father, Richard Harris, came to America in 1835, and as soon as he had become an American citizen he sent for his family. His work as a laborer with railway construction crews took him to Toronto, Canada. Here I was brought up but always as the child of an American citizen. Of that citizenship I have ever been proud. After finishing the common schools, I attended the Normal school with the intention of becoming a teacher. Dressmaking too, I learned proficiently. My first position was teaching in a convent in Monroe, Michigan. Later, I came to Chicago and opened a dress-making establishment. I preferred sewing to bossing little children. However, I went back to teaching again, this time in Memphis, Tennessee. Here I was married in 1861. My husband... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

by Alexander Berkman
This manuscript is part of the International Institute for Social History's Alexander Berkman archive and appears in Anarchy Archives with ISSH's permission. THE AVERAGE AMERICAN (By our Special correspondent ALEXANDER BERKMAN) The general conception of the "type" American is in Europe picturesque and niave at the same time. In France as in Germany, in the Northern as in the Southern countries, in fact throughout the European Continent, with the exception of England perhaps, the opinion of the man in the street about America and Americans is primitive and inadequate. First of all, the name "an American" immediately suggests riches, wealth. It is almost as if American and rich man are synonyms, at least in the view of the average European who has never been in the United States and who seldom comes in direct contact with Americans in Europe. In the min... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

~ The Resurrection, by Leo Tolstoy, 1899
CHAPTER IX. After he had finished the instructions, the presiding justice turned to the prisoners. "Simon Kartinkin, rise!" he said. Simon sprang up nervously. The muscles of his cheeks began to twitch still quicker. "What is your name?" "Simon Petroff Kartinkin," he said quickly, in a sharp voice, evidently prepared for the question. "What estate?" "Peasant." "What government, district?" "Government of Tula, district of Krapivensk, Kupian township, village of Borki." "How old are you?" "Thirty-four; born in eighteen hundred" "What faith?" "Of the Russian orthodox faith." "Are you married?" "O, no!" "What is your occupation?" "I was employed in the Hotel Mauritania." "Were you ever arrested before?" "I was never arrested before, because where I lived" "You w...

by Alexander Berkman
Ideas are true liberators. Ideas as distinguished from so-called reason. For in our work-a-day world there is much reason and too little thought. It is given only to the seer and poet to conceive liberating ideas - impractical, wild thoughts that ultimately light the way of practical, blind man to better and higher endeavor. To "practical" minds the regeneration of the world is an empty dream. To transform the cold winter of our age into the warmth of a beautiful summer day, to change our valley of tears and misery into a luxurious garden of joy is a vain fantasy lacking reason and sanity. But a William Morris sees in his mind's eye a world of comradeship and brotherhood rejoicing in the plenitude of earth's bounty, and he challenges "practical reason" to justify the existence of poverty and antagonism in a society over-rich in all the physical and aesthetic joys of a full human life. The incisive genius of a... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

by Émile Henry, 1894
It is not a defense that I present to you. I am not in any way seeking to escape the reprisals of the society I have attacked. Besides, I acknowledge only one tribunal — myself, and the verdict of any other is meaningless to me. I wish merely to give you an explanation of my acts and to tell you how I was led to perform them. I have been an anarchist for only a short time. It was as recently as the middle of the year 1891 that I entered the revolutionary movement. Up to that time, I had lived in circles entirely imbued with current morality. I had been accustomed to respect and even to love the principles of fatherland and family, of authority and property. For teachers in the present generation too often forget one thing; it is that life, with its struggles and defeats, its injustices and iniquities, takes upon itself indiscreetly to open the eyes of the ignorant to reality. This happened to me, as it happens to everyone. I had been told that li... (From : TheAnarchistLibrary.org.)

Home|About|Contact|Search|Privacy Policy