Browsing Revolt Library By Tag : massachusetts

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The text is from my copy of Emma Goldman's Anarchism and Other Essays. Second Revised Edition. New York & London: Mother Earth Publishing Association, 1911. pp. 173-182.THE HYPOCRISY 0F PURITANISM       SPEAKING of Puritanism in relation to American art, Mr. Gutzon Borglum said: "Puritanism has made us self-centered and hypocritical for so long, that sincerity and reverence for what is natural in our impulses have been fairly bred out of us, with the result that there can be neither truth nor individualality in our art."       Mr. Borglum might have added that Puritanism has made life itself impossible. More than art, more than estheticism, life represents beauty in a thousand v... (From : Anarchy Archives.)

(1816 - 1898) ~ American Anarchist, Individualist, Inventor, and Land Reformer : Joshua K. Ingalls (July 16, 1816 – 1898), born in Swansea, Massachusetts, was an inventor, and land reformer who influenced contemporary individualist anarchists despite never self-identifying as one. He was an associate of Benjamin Tucker and the "Boston anarchists." (From : Wikipedia.)
He believed that government protection of idle land was the foundational source of all limitations on individual liberty. This was in disagreement with Tucker who, while also opposing protection of idle land, believed that government protection of the "banking monopoly" was the greatest evil. (From : Wikipedia.)


In Praise of IdlenessThis text was first provided by the Massachusetts Green Party, but I found out that they have moved or deleted their page, so now I'm keeping a "mirror" of their text. . In this essay, Lord Bertrand Russell proposes a cut in the definition of full time to four hours per day. As this article was written in 1932, he has not the benefit of knowing that, as we added more wage-earners per family (women entered the work force) and families shrunk (fewer kids), and the means of production become more efficient (better machines) the number of hours each wage-earner must work to support the family has stayed constant. These facts seem to uphold Russell's point. Like most of my generation, I... (From : http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Oracle/2528/br_idl....)


Letters of Bartolomeo Vanzetti from the Death House August 4, 1927. From the Death House of the Massachusetts State Prison TO THE DEFENSE COMMITTEE: Governor Alvan T. Fuller is a murderer as Thayer, Katzmann, the State perjurors and all the other.  He shake hand with me like a brother, make me believe he was honestly intentioned and that he had not sent the three carbarn-boy to have no escuse to save us. Now ignoring and denia all the proofs of our innocence and insult us and murder us.  We are innocent. This is a war of plutocracy against liberty, against the people. We die for Anarcy.  Long life Anarcy.     [This letter was written directly after Vanzetti learned of the Governor’s decision... (From : umkc.edu.)


Selected Letters of Nicola Sacco from the Dedham Jail November 30, 1921. Dedham Jail DEAR BARTOLO: Saturday the 26th my Rosie and the children came to visit me, and this was the first time I seen the children since the time you left Dedham.  You can imagine how happy I felt to see them so joyful and so gay and in the best of health, if only you could see little Ines.  She got so fat, she is really a dolly, Dante also looks very good.  He writes to me every week.  Rosa also looks very good after the operation she is gaining daily.  I feel very good and I don't do nothing but exercise, read and write.  I am very sorry that no one comes and see you, no one comes to see me neither, but Rosie . . . ... (From : umkc.edu.)


Selected  Letters of  Vanzetti from the Dedham Jail, April - June 1927 April 14, 1927.  Dedham Jail DEAR COMRADE MARY [DONOVAN]: Today I have written, written and written all the time.  Now it is late and I am tired.  Yet I cannot help to write to you. . . . What I want to say to you is, again and ever, to be calm and self restrained.  Yes, just that and what I do not know to say.  I knew that you lost your job.   Another of their nice things.  Now you are working days and nights to save Nick and I.  Remember that you must rest, and rest at least for the necessity of it.  Good-bye, and all my regards to you, also Nick. [COMRADE MARY was Mary Donovan, a recording secr... (From : umkc.edu.)


Selected Letters of Nicola Sacco from the Charlestown State Prison July 19, 1927 MY DEAR INES**: I would like that you should understand what I am going to say to you, and I wish I could write you so plain, for I long so much to have you hear all the heart-beat, eagemess of your father, for I love you so much as you are the dearest little beloved one. It is quite hard indeed to make you understand in your young age, but I am going to try from the bottom of my heart to make you understand how dear you are to your father's soul.  If I cannot succeed in doing that, I know that you will save this letter and read it over in future years to come and you will see and feel the same heart-beat affection as your father feels in w... (From : umkc.edu.)


A LETTER TO CHARLES SUMNER. Boston,Oct. 12, 1864.Hon. Charles Sumner,Sir: Some four or five weeks ago, as I was in conversation with Dr. S. G. Howe and James M. Stone, they both mentioned that, on their first reading my argument on "the Unconstitutionality of Slavery," they had been convinced of its truth; and Dr. Howe added, "Sumner always said it was true, but somehow or other he could not think it was practical." A few days afterwards I saw Dr. Howe, and repeated to him what I had understood him to say of you, as above, and asked him whether I had understood him correctly. He said that I had; "that is, he had understood you to say, in effect, that you did not see how my argument could be met." I gave him some of my reasons for wish... (From : Anarchy Archives.)


Vanzetti's 1927 Letter to Governor Fuller The letter below was written shortly after Vanzetti was interviewed for two hours by Governor Fuller.  Vanzetti asked the Governor if he might write him about topics not discussed in the interview.  This is the letter he sent.  Six days after this letter was mailed, Governor Fuller issued his decision allowing the executions to go forward. July 28, 1927.  Charlestown Prison Hon. Alvan T. Fuller, Governor of Massachusetts, State House, Boston. YOUR EXCELLENCY: You told me Tuesday night that I might dictate to a stenographer the part, of my statement which I wanted to make to you, but was prevented by lack of time from making.  So I will say as follows:  ... (From : umkc.edu.)


Letter to the American Journal of Sociology Source: Benjamin R.Tucker Papers, New York Public Library;Transcribed: by Mitchell Abidor. Villa “a Lujerneta" Pont Ste Devote Principality of Monaco April 11,1936 To the Editor of the American Journal of Sociology: The University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. Sir: In view of the tissue of falsehoods (I purposely refrain from saying “lies” by the advice of a beloved friend and the cautious Webster) that you have printed about me in your issue of January 1936, there is little wonder that you do not wish to be addressed individually. But, whoever you may be, I shall not allow you to escape responsibility, since I know that the writer knows, and therefore writes with malice ... (From : Marxists.org.)

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